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Campus Candid

Pictured (l-r) Library Director Kristine Kasbohm, Mary O’Sullivan, Vice President for Student Affairs Sara Morris, Bruce J. Dierenfield, Terrence P. Bisson, Christine Kinsey, Rev. Daniel Jamros, SJ, Coral Snodgrass, Ricardo Marable (for Michelle Marable), Edward C. Kisailus, George M. Palumbo, Canisius President John J. Hurley

The campus community turned out on Thursday, November 18 to recognize 13 Canisius College faculty members who have been awarded emeritus status. The ceremony took place in the Andrew L. Bouwhuis Library. A brief reception followed. The emeritus honorees included:

Terrence P. Bisson, PhD

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics & Statistics


Betsy M. DelleBovi, PhD

Professor Emerita of Teacher Education


Bruce Dierenfield, PhD

Professor Emeritus of History

Rev. Daniel Jamros, PhD

Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies & Theology


L. Christine Kinsey, PhD

Professor Emerita of Mathematics & Statistics


Edward C. Kisailus, PhD

Professor Emeritus of Biology


Michele Marable, PhD

Professor Emerita of Teacher Education Posthumous Recognition


George M. Palumbo, PhD

Professor Emeritus of Economics & Finance


Mary C. O’Sullivan, PhD

Professor Emerita of Chemistry & Biochemistry

Richard A. Shick, PhD

Professor Emeritus of Economics & Finance


Coral R. Snodgrass, PhD

Professor Emerita of Management


Timothy H. Wadkins, PhD

Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies & Theology


John Zeis, PhD

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy

Submitted by: College Communications

Canisius in the News

Julie Anna Golebiewski, PhD, associate professor of economics and finance, spoke with The Buffalo News regarding the high demand in the housing market as it relates to the “work from home” trend.  To read more click here.

Golebiewski also spoke with The Buffalo News about how higher wages in a scarce worker pool has affected how jobs are being filled and why that is causing the unemployment rate to be higher than pre-pandemic levels. To read more click here.

Submitted by: College Communications

Festive Holiday Sweater Contest

The holidays are a time of joy and peace but sometimes a little competition is fun too! Let’s spruce things up this holiday season by wearing festive holiday sweaters on Friday, December 17.

Submit your photos as a department to Audrey Browka at browkaa@canisius.edu, and the department that is selected for having the most festive showing of holiday sweaters will win a pizza party!

Submitted by: Bethany Vorhees, executive associate to the president

Preventing Harassment and Discrimination

Every employer in New York State is required to provide employees with sexual harassment prevention training on an annual basis. Canisius College is committed to maintaining a workplace free from sexual harassment and is partnering with Everfi to provide “Preventing Harassment and Discrimination.”

This course prepares our faculty and staff to cultivate and maintain a workplace culture resistant to discrimination, harassment and retaliation. Faculty and staff will be equipped with the information and skills that promote intervention, empathy, and allyship. This course includes a section specific to requirements under Title IX and the Clery Act.

To comply with the New York State deadline, we ask that you complete Preventing Harassment and Discrimination by December 31

Everfi Training Invitation

Your training invitation will be sent directly from Everfi later this week or you can use the “Everfi Training Platform” link in the portal, found in Human Resources Home, under Important Documents/Compliance.

The self-paced, interactive course takes most people about 45 minutes to complete. The Everfi support team is available here to provide assistance by phone, Email or chat. If you have any other questions about this required course, please contact the Human Resources Office at 716-888-2240.

Submitted by: Linda M. Walleshauser, associate vice president for Human Resources and Compliance

 

United Way Campaign Prize Winner – Sharon Federico

Congratulations to Sharon Federico, support manager for business and student affairs, who was our third United Way prize basket winner.

When you donate to the 2021 Canisius campaign, your name will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win a prize basket.  To make a pledge, simply click the United Way icon on the portal page and follow the instructions listed.

With generous support from people like you, the United Way of Buffalo & Erie County can serve under-resourced communities, make sure everyone has access to health care, receives a quality education and can build a financially stable path forward.

If you have any questions about the process of making your E-pledge, please contact one of the following members of the United Way Committee: Linda Walleshauser (Ext. 2244); Bethany Voorhees (Ext. 2100) or Maggie Burkard (Ext. 2120).

Thank you again, Sharon, for your donation to the United Way and congratulations!

Submitted by: Maggie Burkard, support manager, Academic Affairs

Jefferson Ave Streetscape Improvements

Don’t miss the chance to provide your thoughts and feedback to planners from the city of Buffalo as they prepare to make improvements to the Jefferson Avenue streetscape between Main St. and E. Utica St.  With the demolition of the Canisius parking ramp, we have an opportunity to beautify Jefferson Avenue and make it safer for pedestrians and cyclists. 

The public meeting will be held at Canisius College Science Hall, Room 1013A at 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December  8.  

See the flyer above for more details. Masks are required. If you have questions, contact Mary Rockwell at rockwel3@canisius.edu.

Submitted by: Mary Rockwell, PhD, director, The New Buffalo Institute

 

Every Bottom Covered Donation Drive

every-bottom-covered-1

As the holiday season approaches and in the spirit of the Jesuit value of men and women for and with others,  please consider donating to Every Bottom Covered – the first and only diaper bank in Western New York.  Items that are being collected include diapers, pull-ups, wipes, diaper rash cream and feminine hygiene products.  

You can make your donation to one of the bins located in the Communications Department (Lyons 314), the Commuter Student Association Club Room, the Commuter Lounge, the library, and the ROTC Office (Health Science).  Donations are being accepted until December 10.  All donations are greatly appreciated.  Happy Holidays!

Questions? Please contact: Melissa Wanzer wanzerm@canisius.edu or Kyra Laurie lauriek@canisius.edu.

Submitted by: Katie McMahon, graduate assistant, Communication Studies Department

 

December Makerspace

Please join us for another Makerspace on Thursday, December 9, 2021 in the Andrew L. Bouwhuis Library from 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. At this event, students, faculty and staff are invited to work on knitting, crochet and sewing projects that will be collected and donated to the Mitten Fence in the People’s Park, north of our campus.

Participants will be introduced to Bible journaling with artist Nichole Auquier. Examples from Nichole’s practice have been on display in the Peter A. and Mary Lou Vogt Gallery in the Library this semester.

Materials will be made available thanks to the generous donations of Taheri and Todoro PC, and Makerspace will be hosted by Professor Yvonne Widenor from the Art History program.  We also welcome you to bring your own Bible, journal or favorite book for the journaling practice.

For more information about this event, please Email Professor Widenor at widenory@canisius.edu.

Submitted by: Yvonne K. Widenor, M.A., visiting assistant professor and art history program director, Fine Arts Department

COLI’s End of Semester Checklist for Instructors

It’s coming up to the end of the semester again. Here are some actions you should take by the week after grades are due:

  • Enter your Final Grades through MyCanisius. Click here for a brief video tutorial.
  • If you want students to see their Final Calculated Grade, click here to see a tutorial on how to do that.
  • Export your gradebook to archive the grades for your personal record. See this tutorial here to do that.
  • Archive your entire D2L course in the Brightspace format at the end of each term for your personal record. Click this link to see how to do that.
  • If you are teaching courses in the next semester, copy course content so you do not have to rush through it and have time to work on it in between semesters. Click here to see how. Text instructions are available here.
  • If you have not already, inform the Canisius Bookstore of any books or Cengage Unlimited products you intend to use. If you are not planning on using books or Cengage Unlimited products, let the bookstore know that as well. See their page here for more contact information.

You can click here to view the COLI Checklist page, which has further resources. View the video below for a quick overview of the End of Semester Checklist:

https://youtu.be/8bIEBVDhm8M

Submitted by: Tyler J. Kron-Piatek, academic technologist, COLI

Sign up for the Winter 2022 Faculty Development Week!

The Academic Affairs office is organizing the 2022 Winter Faculty Development Week, taking place on campus in January, prior to the start of the spring semester. This will be a fantastic set of opportunities in faculty and staff development. We also added more sessions! Click here for more information on events, panels, workshops, and sessions! Click here to access the sign-up sheet! The “Week” is longer than a Week! 

Submitted by: Tyler J. Kron-Piatek, academic technologist, COLI

Panopto, D2L and Canisius

Starting next semester, instructors will be able to use Panopto for their courses.

Panopto is a video content management system (CMS) that will be available to you right inside of D2L, without any additional sign-ins on your part. This means that you can record or upload, edit, and curate videos for your courses without needing to leave D2L. This makes Panopto much easier to use than Google Drive or YouTube. Instructors do not have to use a separate program to record videos or go to a different website to upload videos. Also with Panopto, you can insert the video (without jumping through too many hoops) directly into the module or activity so that students see a video player instead of clicking a link.

Panopto has simple editing tools that will allow you to remove portions of your video quickly and painlessly. For those that want more out of the editor, you can also include multiple screens at the same time, other videos from other sources or website pages, and create in-video quizzes. For most users, the web app version of Panopto will be enough. The web version will automatically upload the video to Panopto. Users that want more control over their recordings or users with weak/no internet access can use the desktop version of Panopto. Regardless of whether or not you have internet access, the desktop app will create a video file of your recording on your PC. Otherwise, the desktop app will also try to upload the video to Panopto when you have internet. If you already have videos that you want to re-use or videos recorded using Screencast-o-Matic or other screen-recorder, you can also choose to upload these videos to Panopto through D2L.

Each course will have its own Panopto folder, allowing you to quickly find videos for the course you are in when you access it in D2L. If you want to, you can even get videos from previous versions of the course or other courses and share the videos with the current D2L course.

Stay tuned to the COLI Blog and the Dome to keep for more information on when tutorials and workshops will be available.

Campus Candid

Pictured (l-r) Katie Costanzo, Daniel Haeusser, Veronica Serwacki, Mark Meyer and Sue Margulis

On Saturday, Veronica Serwacki, Katie Costanzo, Daniel Haeusser, Mark Meyer and Sue Margulis prepared the raised beds and closed up the East West Community Garden for the winter.

Many thanks to all of the faculty and staff who worked spring, summer and fall to create a beautiful and productive green space in our neighborhood.  And a special shout out to our work-study student Jennifer Guzman!

Submitted by: Mary Rockwell, PhD, director, The New Buffalo Institute

Canisius in the News

Sara Morris, PhD, vice president for academic affairs, was interviewed by Business First in a story about giving employers advice on hiring new employees. To read more click here.

Julie Anna Golebiewski, PhD, associate professor of economics and finance, spoke with The Buffalo News about how the economy may struggle amidst the recent Covid spikes.  To read more click here.

Submitted by: College Communications

The Dome Goes on Break for Thanksgiving Holiday

Just a friendly reminder that due to the Thanksgiving holiday, The Dome will not publish this Friday, November 26 or Monday, November 29. The employee E-letter will resume its regular schedule on Wednesday, December 1. All submissions must be received by 2:00 p.m. on the day prior to publication.

Thank you … and have a blessed Thanksgiving.

Submitted by: College Communications

Canisius Alumnae Win 2nd Place in Venture Competition

Congratulations to Alicia ’11, MS ’12 and Alisa ’10, MS ’12 Officer, who took home second place in the Multicultural Small Business Innovation Lab pitch competition. The New Buffalo Institute at Canisius partnered with M&T Bank to launch the pilot program aimed at accelerating the growth of small businesses owned by Black, Indigenous, Latinx and LGBTW individuals on Buffalo’s East Side. The six-week initiative culminated in a ‘shark tank’-style venture, which awarded financial support to the top three winners in the pitch competition.

Alicia and Alisa Officer are co-founders and co-owners of Unapologetic Coffee, which makes specialty coffee more accessible to Black and Brown people in Buffalo. The company produces small-batch roasts and sells their products to other businesses and directly to consumers via online sales and subscription services. Alicia and Alisa plan to use their prize funding ($3,000) to hire a part-time staff member to help manage their social media channels and expand their marketing capabilities.

To learn more about them and their company, click here.

A significant portion of the innovation lab included guidance and education in business planning, establishing credit, accessing capital, marketing and networking.  Professors from the Richard J. Wehle School of Business worked with the Women’s Business Center to plan this content, and the college hosted classes on campus.   

Submitted by: Mary Rockwell, PhD, director, New Buffalo Institute

DiGamma Nominations Now Being Accepted

 

The Canisius College Alumni Board of Directors invites DiGamma Members to submit nominations for the 2022 DiGamma Induction Ceremony.

Individuals eligible for nomination must meet the following criteria:

  • ALUMNI who have distinguished themselves over an extended period of time working for the advancement of the college.
  • ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY who have distinguished themselves over an extended period of time through exemplary service for or on behalf of students and alumni.

Please submit your nominations to the Office of Alumni Engagement no later than Monday, December 13, 2021.

The nomination form is available ONLINE. Please complete the section of the form that corresponds to DiGamma Honor Society. (Kindly note that current DiGamma members are listed on this website for reference.)

Submitted by: Erin Zack, director, Office of Alumni Engagement

RFP Contract Opportunity

The Women’s Business Center (WBC) is currently looking for a research and curriculum development consultant.

There are a lot of programs out there regarding financial literacy and getting loan-ready, yet we are hardly seeing the statistics change on the lack of access to capital for women business owners. The Covid pandemic has also shown us that the low-to-moderate income families have the most difficulty accessing the capital support offered in a timely manner.

The individual hired for this role will research what’s needed, what’s out there and what’s not, and then design a curriculum for the WBC to implement next fall.

Click HERE to read RFP.

Submitted by: Christel Brown, coordinator, Women’s Business Center

Reminder: Fall 2021 Faculty Development Lunches and Resources

A reminder to join in two casual lunch meetup groups that came out of the Summer Faculty Development week! We also have asynchronous resources to support your faculty development needs during the semester and look forward to seeing you at faculty development sessions during the winter intersession.

Lunch Meetup Groups:

Join with your colleagues for conversation and connection over lunch. The final two lunches will happen at the Dining Hall. Please click here to RSVP for some or all of the lunch groups this semester. Note that because lunch is provided, this event is only open to vaccinated individuals.

  • Inclusive teaching. Join in conversation about general strategies from grading to open education resources to supporting individual students. Our last meeting is at 12:00 p.m. on Monday, December 6 (12/6).
  • Scholarship and writing. Come together to support and commiserate about any form of academic writing and think longingly of future writing retreats! Meets at 12:00 p.m. on Monday, December 13 (12/13).

Thanks to those colleagues who suggested faculty meetup groups for two topics and who have joined us so far! Stay tuned for spring meet ups!

Asynchronous Resources:

Winter Intersession Development Opportunities:

The first week of January, we will enjoy a scholarship-focused week with a day focused on faculty scholarship resources followed by a multi-day on campus writing retreat to help you kick off the year strong. The second week of January, get ready for Winter Faculty Development Week with a focus on inclusive and innovative teaching strategies. Please click here for more information and to RSVP!

If you have other suggestions for faculty development opportunities, please do not hesitate to reach out to Jenn Lodi-Smith, assistant vice president for academic affairs, at lodismij@canisius.edu.

Submitted by: Jennifer Lodi-Smith, AVPAA & professor, Psychology

Campus Candid I

Thank you to all the Canisius volunteers who lent a helping hand on Saturday, November 20 during the turkey and produce giveaway, held in the Spillman Parking Lot.

Approximately 300 turkeys and 300 boxes of produce were distributed to the neighboring Canisius community and those in need, in advance of the Thanksgiving holiday. The college collaborated on the drive-through with MMB Realty Group, Urban Fruits and Veggies, KeyBank and Creative Structures.

Submitted by: College Communications

Campus Candid II

Chartwells’ Thankful Sit Down Dinner saw an amazing turnout of students, faculty and staff. Nearly 550 guests and volunteers attended the annual event and donated more than 1,000 pounds of food to The Buffalo City Mission and St. Luke’s Mission of Mercy.

Submitted by: College Communications

Early Closure-Thanksgiving Holiday

As graciously announced by President Hurley at the Town Hall meeting on November 19, the college will close at 12:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 24. All but essential operating personnel are included in this early closure. The college will also be closed on Thursday, November 25 and Friday, November 26.  It will reopen on Monday, November 29.

We wish you a safe and Happy Thanksgiving holiday!

Submitted by: Linda M. Walleshauser, associate vice president, Human Resources and Compliance

 

Leaves are Falling, Coffee is Calling!

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, as a small expression of gratitude for all that faculty and staff have done throughout another challenging year, please take a moment to relax and enjoy a cup of coffee, tea or hot chocolate on President Hurley from the Tim Hortons on campus!

Vouchers for a medium-sized coffee, tea or hot chocolate will be valid to use starting today, Monday, November 22 and continuing through Wednesday, November 24, and will be available for pick-up on any weekday this week at the Human Resources Office in Old Main Room 100 or the President’s Office in Bagen 100.

Submitted by: Bethany Voorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

SEEK the LIGHT

Nature’s rhythm has a hold on us.  As day light comes in short supply during this time of year, we all look for light despite the darkness.

Many established religions take the opportunity to use this natural phenomenon to reflect on something deeper; the light and darkness of our lives individually and communally.  Some have established this as a time of the appearance of their strongest symbols to carry them through the darkness into the light.

Various gods and goddesses of the world’s religious traditions have their birth/celebration dates set around this time to symbolize that light overcomes the darkness.  Examples include, Egyptian Sun God Horus, the Persian God Mithras, the Japanese Goddess of the Sun, Amaterasu, and the Indian Queen of Heaven Sarasvati who are all celebrated during these dark days.

Saint Lucy’s Day on December 13 celebrates Saint Lucy of Syracuse who delivered food to the persecuted Christians hiding in the catacombs during the 4th century wearing a wreath of light to light her way.  Her feast day at one time coincided with the winter solstice as a reminder of Jesus Christ )whose birthday is celebrated on December 25th) is the light of the world.  The Christian tradition has established a four week period of waiting prior to Jesus’ birth to reflect on the Light breaking through the darkness.  This season is called Advent and marks the time of waiting in joyful hope for salvation to enter the world as well as our waiting for Jesus to come at the end of time.

No matter your religious affiliation, this time marks an opportunity to reflect on the light that breaks through the darkness.  Campus Ministry is offering you an opportunity to SEEK the LIGHT; a simple reflection of keep hope during the dark days by focusing on the light.  Each day, from November 28 through December 25, a word will be offered for your reflection.  That’s right, a word.  If you “like” us on Facebook at Canisius Campus Ministry, “follow” us on Instagram @canisiuscampmin or when you open the myCanisius portal, you will see the word for the day.

It’s simple! Look at the word and allow that word to live inside you that day.  You’ll be surprised how often that word will come up for you during the day and draw you closer to light.  A bonus, if you’d like, on Instagram and FB you will be able to offer your own reflection for others to see but only if you want.

Our hope and prayer is that this word of the day will draw you closer to the light during these natural days of darkness.

Submitted by: Deacon Greg Feary, campus minister, Campus Ministry

 

Live Well, Work Well

stress-and-your-skin

This short read from Lawley Insurance Group explains how stress can negatively affect the health of your skin and provides some tips for reducing stress in your life, which is especially applicable to this time of year as we approach the holidays.

Submitted by: Bethany Voorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

Better Feedback on Student Work

A chronic complaint among college faculty is that students do not read or act upon the feedback professors provide on student work. But properly conceived feedback to individual students can be as much or more important than anything you present in lecture or have students do in other activities. Here are some tips to make feedback more efficient and effective.

When grading exams, homework, papers or essays, reports, and other student work, professors work hard to provide comprehensive feedback. “Grading” is often spending time describing to students, via red pen or keyboard, how they can do better either on a specific subsequent assignment, or in the future generally. After all that time and effort assessing student work it is disheartening to discover that a student subsequently made halfhearted improvements, or ignored the feedback altogether.

Feedback as Next Steps

Instead of attempting to comment on every issue you find in a student’s work, consider this: If you could only pick a few, what are the next actions on which the student should focus their reflection, time, effort, and courage?

How many next actions or steps depends on assignment design, length, scale, scope, frequency, and so on. But generally, for a short writing assignment you may need to supply only one direction for a next step. For a longer or larger assignment, you might pick several. Likely, these are issues

  • that are fundamentals in your course subject, disciplinary content or style of communication.
  • that are more urgent. For example, if a student has not mastered a particular concept, they may not be able to advance in the course.
  • for which you can quickly highlight numerous instances. That is, a more common problem in their work.

However you choose next actions for each student, you are directing them to focus on a few important issues rather than itemizing every flaw in their assignment submission.

Actionable Feedback

It is possible for faculty provide too much feedback. When students see a carpet of red ink down the margins of their paper, or an essay almost as long as that which they submitted detailing all large and small problems with their work, they can easily become discouraged. They might reason: Is all this worth it, or can I just live with a C? A C grade might not derail their future career plans, but their resignation stops their learning or developing as writers, researchers or creators.

Plus, even if they are willing to consider their professor’s feedback, where do they begin? Where should they spend more time: improving their argument? Improving visual aids? Revisiting their organization? All those sentence construction problems?

Instead, if a student is handed just two or three things to focus on when improving a draft, this seems manageable and realistic. They have time to properly reflect on each issue, experiment with their ideas, seek further advice, revisit the library, and take more thorough action toward those few, specific goals.

After they complete that next draft or assignment, a student will still have other problems in their work. Sure, but if they sincerely worked along your proposed improvements, they have advanced as learners and creators, rather than just got another assignment out of the way.

Efficient Feedback

It is possible for faculty to spend too much of their time grading or providing feedback. If the above is true it becomes counterproductive to pile on with commentary when grading.

By choosing a few action items for each student, you avoid spending time itemizing and commenting on every issue in every student paper, or fall short of that through predictable exhaustion. Plus, if you are asking students to revise a draft or complete a series of similar assignments, you can revisit what directions you gave to each student, when next you assess their work.

Growth as a Course Feature

If the above makes sense to you, then you might consider adopting a multi-stage development assignment, or a series of smaller, similar assignments in your course. Designed to teach as well as assess a set of research, analysis, writing or creative skills, such assignments can help your students systematically learn better scholarship and composition as well as help you understand how students learn, and where they typically suffer setbacks or snags. As students overcome one challenge, you can pose others to them in subsequent assignments, and by the end of the semester they should be demonstrably better at whatever is described in your learning goals and objectives for the course.

Focused, action-item feedback can help students focus on improving their skills and abilities, while saving you time (and aggravation!) as you teach.

D2L Fall/Winter Updates

Discussions: Simplified Accessibility & Visibility Management

When: December

Some of the options in D2L Discussion’s Restriction Tab will have updated language and options moved to make it easier to manage restriction, visibility, and access to Discussion boards:

  • Locking Options are being updated so that you only need to set the Start and End date, with Visibility and Accessibility options underneath each
  • The language for Locking Options have been updated to be a bit clearer/simpler:
Availability Start Date Option What it does
Visibile with Access Restricted before start The Discussion topic (or forum) is visible but students will not be able to open it until the start date. Name, date, other restrictions will be visible, but the description will not be.
Visible with submission restricted before start The topic (or forum) will be visible and accessible to students. However, they will not be able to post to it, making it read-only until the start date.
Hidden before start The topic (or forum) is cannot be seen and is not accessible by students until the start date. Notifications will not be sent until the start date.
Availability End Date Option What it does
Visibile with Access Restricted after end The Discussion topic (or forum) is visible but students will not be able to open it after the end date.
Visible with submission restricted after end The topic (or forum) will be visible and accessible to students (they will be able to see posts). However, they will not be able to post to it, making it read-only after the end date.
Hidden after end The topic (or forum) is cannot be seen and is not accessible by students after the end date. Notifications will also stop.

Examples of option selections and how they affect the forum/topic:

The Default is Visible with access restricted before the start (Unlock) and Visible with access restricted after end (Lock):

  • Students cannot see anything beyond the Topic or Forum Title, dates, and other restrictions. For topics specifically, students can see topic stats and who posted last. For forums, students will not be able to see titles of topics.

Visible with submission restricted before start (Unlock) and Visible with submission restricted after end (Lock) (Recommended):

  • Students can see everything above, topic/forum descriptions and details, and also their posts. They will just be unable to post to or participate in topics or forums.

Hidden before start and Hidden after end:

  • The topic (or forum) will only be accessible to students for the dates specified. After that, students will no longer be able to see the topic or forum– it will be made invisible to them.

Visible with access restricted before the start and Visible with submission restricted after end:

  • Students will only be able to see the title of the Forum (and titles of the topics within) or Topic and the associated dates and other restrictions, but not the description. After the end date, they will be able to see everything about the topic (or in the forum) but will not be able to particpate in them or post to them.

For more information, please click this link.

File Upload Warning Messages

When: November

This is mostly for students, but if you ever saw an “Invalid File Type Error”, a new message will now be appearing that provides more information on the issue:

“This file extension is not allowed for security reasons. Please see our Restricted File Extensions article in the D2L Community for more detailed information.”

For Dropbox Assignments, if a student goes to upload a file that you restricted, they will get a message stating “This file extension is not allowed”.

Quizzes: Clearer Wording

When: December

D2L will be updating some of the wording in the Quiz Editor to make it more clear as to what each option does:

Old Wording New Wording
Automatic Grade Automatically Publish Evaluation
Allow attempt to be set as graded immediately after completion Auto-publish attempt results immediately upon completion
Auto-Export to Grades Synchronize to Gradebook
Allow automatic export to grades Sync to Gradebook on publish

Dropboxes: New Editor Made Default

When: December

The new Dropbox Editor, which we reported on in December 2020, will be on by default. This means that you will NOT be able to use the old editor and the new editor will be the only one available to you.

Document Viewer: Toolbar Location Change & Other Changes

When: November & December

There will be two changes happening to the toolbar for the D2L Document Viewer. The first, a minor one, will be moving the tools from the bottom of the page to the top of the page. The iconography will also be updated.

The second change will occur in December. This will streamline these tools further and make them more accessible for users. Certain toolbar tools, like View as Text and Download, will only appear on certain file types, like PowerPoints or Word Docs. PDF’s can only be downloaded by using the download button located near the bottom of the page.

For more information, please view click here or sign-up for the D2L Updates & Changes Workshop here.

If you have any questions about these updates, please contact COLI via the ITS Helpdesk (helpdesk@canisius.edu or helpdesk.canisius.edu)

Canisius Commits to the Laudato Si’ Action Platform

Canisius College became one of the first universities in the United States to commit to the Laudato Si’ Action Platform, inspired by Pope Francis’ 2015 ecological encyclical, “Laudato Si’: On Care for our Common Home.” 

The Laudato Si’ Action Platform is a Vatican-led initiative, in collaboration with several partners, to empower the universal Church to achieve total sustainability in the holistic spirit of integral ecology.  The goal is to have various partners with the Church agree to a seven-year journey toward sustainability.

The Vatican’s Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development launched the enrollment phase of the Platform on Sunday, November 14, 2021, the Global Day of Prayer for the Poor. This day is a deeply meaningful symbol of the Platform’s commitment to serving those who are most vulnerable to the consequences of our socio-ecological crisis.

To learn more about Laudato Si’ and Canisius’ involvement in it, click here.

Submitted by: College Communications

Racial Equity Workshop

The Office of Diversity & Inclusion would like to extend an invitation for faculty and staff to attend the DEI & Racial Equity Workshop on Monday, November 29, at 3:30 p.m. It is vital to our campus climate that we continue to promote reflection, dialogue and learning for all members of the institution.  As outlined in our racial equity strategic plan, one of our priorities as a college is to increase institutional capacity and to encourage individuals to utilize their enhanced awareness and knowledge in their roles and in their work:

Witness to Injustice/KAIROS Blanket Exercise,  Monday, November 29, 2021,  3:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. in collaboration with the ALANA Student Center

Presenters:  Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation (NOON) and Facilitators from the Haudenosaunee Confederacy

A 2.5 hour interactive program that utilizes meaningful quotes and visual representations of history to foster truth, understanding, and respect between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.  The Witness to Injustice Blanket Exercise will deepen one’s understanding of the European colonization of Turtle Island, the denial of Indigenous peoples’ nationhood, and the acquisition of land (many times illegal) throughout U.S. history past and present. ZOOM EVENT-REGISTRATION

We look forward to seeing you,

Submitted by: Fatima Rodriguez Johnson, associate dean, Diversity & Inclusion

 

Emily Yancey ’13 Sings Title Role in WNED Broadcast

susannah-presented-by-buffalo-opera-unlimited-premieres-monday

On Monday, November 22 at 9:00 p.m., WNED TV will broadcast Buffalo Opera Unlimited’s (BOU) production of Carlisle Floyd’s opera “Susannah” with alumna Emily Yancey singing the title role. It will be her second televised performance with BOU. The opera is a retelling of the biblical story of Susannah and the Elders set in the mountains of Tennessee. It is one of the most performed American operas.

Yancey studied voice at Canisius with Melissa Thorburn and received a BA in music performance in 2013. She has performed to critical acclaim at various venues in Western New York, having major roles in opera, musical theater and spoken drama.

Submitted by: Richard Falkenstein, professor emeritus, Fine Arts

 

Leaves are Falling, Coffee is Calling!

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, as a small expression of gratitude for all that faculty and staff have done throughout another challenging year, please take a moment to relax and enjoy a cup of coffee, tea or hot chocolate on President Hurley from the Tim Hortons on campus!

Vouchers for a medium-sized coffee, tea or hot chocolate will be valid to use on any of the following days: Monday, November 22 – Wednesday, November 24, and will be available for pick-up on any weekday this week or next at the Human Resources Office in Old Main Room 100 or the President’s Office in Bagen 100.

Submitted by: Bethany Voorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

 

United Way Campaign Prize Winner – Monika McFoy


Congratulations to Monika McFoy, assistant director of support services in the Griff Center, who was selected as this week’s United Way prize basket winner.

When you donate to the 2021 Canisius campaign, your name will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win a prize basket.  To make a pledge, simply click the United Way icon on the portal page and follow the instructions listed.

With generous support from people like you, the United Way of Buffalo & Erie County can serve under-resourced communities, make sure everyone has access to health care, receives a quality education and can build a financially stable path forward.

If you have any questions about the process of making your E-pledge, please contact one of the following members of the United Way Committee: Linda Walleshauser (Ext. 2244); Bethany Voorhees (Ext. 2100) or Maggie Burkard (Ext. 2120)

Thank you again Monika for your donation to the United Way and congratulations!

Submitted by: Maggie Burkard, support manager, Academic Affair

 

COLI’s End of Semester Checklist for Instructors

It’s coming up to the end of the semester again. Here are some actions you should take by the week after grades are due:

  • Enter your Final Grades through MyCanisius. Click here for a brief video tutorial.
  • If you want students to see their Final Calculated Grade, click here to see a tutorial on how to do that.
  • Export your gradebook to archive the grades for your personal record. See this tutorial here to do that.
  • Archive your entire D2L course in the Brightspace format at the end of each term for your personal record. Click this link to see how to do that.
  • If you are teaching courses in the next semester, copy course content so you do not have to rush through it and have time to work on it in between semesters. Click here to see how. Text instructions are available here.
  • If you have not already, inform the Canisius Bookstore of any books or Cengage Unlimited products you intend to use. If you are not planning on using books or Cengage Unlimited products, let the bookstore know that as well. See their page here for more contact information.

You can click here to view the COLI Checklist page, which has further resources. View the video below for a quick overview of the End of Semester Checklist:

https://youtu.be/8bIEBVDhm8M

Submitted by: Tyler J. Kron-Piatek, academic technologist, COLI

Town Hall Webinar

Faculty and staff are invited to join President John Hurley and members of the Senior Leadership Team (SLT) for a Town Hall webinar on Friday, November 19, 2021 at 1:00 p.m.  The group will provide an update on the college’s Covid-19 response, information on enrollment and other plans for the spring semester. There will also be time for Q&A.  Zoom webinar information, including the link, is available below:

Join the Webinar:

https://canisius.zoom.us/j/98016336919

Or One tap mobile : 

    US: +16465588656,,98016336919#  or +13126266799,,98016336919#

Or Telephone:

    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):

        US: +1 646 558 8656  or +1 312 626 6799  or +1 301 715 8592  or +1 669 900 6833  or +1 253 215 8782  or +1 346 248 7799

Webinar ID: 980 1633 6919

International numbers available: https://canisius.zoom.us/u/acTxV7w9xE

         

If you would like to submit a question in advance or request that the SLT address a particular topic, please visit: http://canisius.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6o0NTUygLq4VCqW 

(Advance submissions are anonymous and due by noon, Thursday, November 18)

Submitted by: Bethany Vorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

New Research Explores Relationship Between Autism and Aging

Researchers from the Institute for Autism Research (IAR) and departments of Psychology and Kinesiology recently published evidence that autism characteristics are associated with challenges in physical health, mental health and psychological well-being during later life. This work was published on November 3, 2021 in the Journals of Gerontology: Series B. 

These findings are part of the Aging and Autism Study, funded by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging and led by Jennifer Lodi-Smith, PhD, Jonathan D. Rodgers, PhD and Karl F. Kozlowski, PhD. This work could only be completed thanks to the generosity of the 294 participants aged 53-96 (57% female, 97% White, 97% without an autism diagnosis) who contributed their time and responses in the spring and summer of 2019.

Using survey methods, study researchers show that individuals who reported higher autism characteristics also reported greater health challenges.  More specifically, they reported difficulty with social engagement due to poor physical health, poor mental health including depression and anxiety, and limited satisfaction with life and psychological well-being. 

To learn more, click here.

Submitted by: College Communications

College Bookstore Faculty & Staff Holiday Shopping Discount

Get some of your holiday shopping done at the Canisius College Bookstore this year!

The bookstore is offering one-time-use 30% off coupons to all faculty and staff.  Stop by the Human Resources Department in Old Main 100 to get your coupon, which will be available for use starting today until the end of 2021.  For the bookstore hours and contact information, click here.

Submitted by: Bethany Voorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

 

 

Social Media Initiative


To faculty, students and club leaders: In an effort to increase overall social media presence, we recommend that all Canisius-related accounts try to tag @canisius_college in Instagram posts and @CanisiusCollege in Twitter posts. It will be a great way to increase engagement for the college’s accounts and all related club accounts and activities.

With more than 6,000 followers on Instagram and nearly 10,000 on Twitter, this will also help the smaller accounts receive additional exposure. Plus, alumni, parents and potential students can enjoy seeing what is going on at Canisius!

This is not mandatory but will be mutually beneficial and help our social engagement across the community. Thank you.

Submitted by: College Communications

Faculty Development Lunches & Resources

A reminder to join in two casual lunch meetup groups that came out of the Summer Faculty Development week! We also have asynchronous resources to support your faculty development needs during the semester and look forward to seeing you at faculty development sessions during the winter intersession.

Lunch Meetup Groups in the Newly Revamped Faculty Lounge:

Join with your colleagues for conversation and connection over lunch in the faculty lounge. Lunch will be provided from a variety of local restaurants throughout the semester. Please click here to RSVP for some or all of the lunch groups this semester. Note that because lunch is provided, this event is only open to vaccinated individuals.

  • Inclusive teaching. Join in conversation about general strategies from grading to open education resources to supporting individual students. Our last meeting is at 12:00 p.m. on Monday, December 6 (12/6).
  • Scholarship and writing. Come together to support and commiserate about any form of academic writing and think longingly of future writing retreats! Meets at 12:00 p.m. on the following Mondays: November 22, (11/22) and December 13, (12/13).

Thanks to those colleagues who suggested faculty meetup groups for two topics and who have joined us so far!

Asynchronous Resources:

Winter Intersession Development Opportunities:

The first week of January, we will enjoy a scholarship-focused week with a day focused on faculty scholarship resources followed by a multi-day on campus writing retreat to help you kick off the year strong. The second week of January, get ready for Winter Faculty Development Week with a focus on inclusive and innovative teaching strategies. Please click here for more information and to RSVP!

If you have other suggestions for faculty development opportunities, please do not hesitate to reach out to Jenn Lodi-Smith, assistant vice president for academic affairs, at lodismij@canisius.edu.

Submitted by: Jennifer Lodi-Smith, AVPAA & professor, Psychology

Magis Podcast Episode 5

Students in Barbara Irwin, PhD and Jamie O’Neil’s communication classes are teaming up this semester to create episodes of “The Magis Podcast,” featuring student-faculty dialogues at Canisius College.

In this week’s episode, student Carrie Rizzuto (DMA ‘21) and Associate Professor of History Julie Gibert, PhD, discusses the history of food and how the past has influenced the present. Students involved in the production are Bailey Blair (COM & DMA ‘21), Shania Clarke (COM & DMA ‘22), Carrie Rizzuto, Alex Rozbicki (DMA ‘24), and Gabrielle Guzinski (DMA & IMC ‘23).

The podcast is NOW AVAILABLE to listen to on Spotify!

Watch the Trailer:

https://youtu.be/RoFyzdH6Q5I

Listen to the Podcast:

https://open.spotify.com/show/7JA4g7PADZOxqkhTp00wlT

Submitted by: Katie McMahon, graduate assistant, Communication Studies Department

 

Fundraising for Afghan Families

new-red-afghan-poster-2

Canisius students taking the Identity and Power (HON 236) class are leading a Venmo fundraiser to purchase coats for the Afghan refugees who will stay in the Delavan Townhouse complex at Canisius.

Our students are in the process of creating a warm welcoming atmosphere for our guests who were forced to leave their homes due to unfortunate conditions in their country. Lightly-used coats are also accepted forms of donation. Please contact Hawa Saleh (Email:saleh5@canisius.edu).

Campus Ministry is also accepting checks for this project.  Please see the attached flyer for QR codes for the Venmo account and a video created by the group.
Anything helps!

This effort is a part of the social action projects for HON 236: Identity and Power.

Submitted by: Secil Ertorer, associate professor, Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice and Environmental Studies

Better Feedback on Student Work

A chronic complaint among college faculty is that students do not read or act upon the feedback professors provide on student work. But properly conceived feedback to individual students can be as much or more important than anything you present in lecture or have students do in other activities. Here are some tips to make feedback more efficient and effective.

When grading exams, homework, papers or essays, reports, and other student work, professors work hard to provide comprehensive feedback. “Grading” is often spending time describing to students, via red pen or keyboard, how they can do better either on a specific subsequent assignment, or in the future generally. After all that time and effort assessing student work it is disheartening to discover that a student subsequently made halfhearted improvements, or ignored the feedback altogether.

Feedback as Next Steps

Instead of attempting to comment on every issue you find in a student’s work, consider this: If you could only pick a few, what are the next actions on which the student should focus their reflection, time, effort, and courage?

How many next actions or steps depends on assignment design, length, scale, scope, frequency, and so on. But generally, for a short writing assignment you may need to supply only one direction for a next step. For a longer or larger assignment, you might pick several. Likely, these are issues

  • that are fundamentals in your course subject, disciplinary content or style of communication.
  • that are more urgent. For example, if a student has not mastered a particular concept, they may not be able to advance in the course.
  • for which you can quickly highlight numerous instances. That is, a more common problem in their work.

However you choose next actions for each student, you are directing them to focus on a few important issues rather than itemizing every flaw in their assignment submission.

Actionable Feedback

It is possible for faculty provide too much feedback. When students see a carpet of red ink down the margins of their paper, or an essay almost as long as that which they submitted detailing all large and small problems with their work, they can easily become discouraged. They might reason: Is all this worth it, or can I just live with a C? A C grade might not derail their future career plans, but their resignation stops their learning or developing as writers, researchers or creators.

Plus, even if they are willing to consider their professor’s feedback, where do they begin? Where should they spend more time: improving their argument? Improving visual aids? Revisiting their organization? All those sentence construction problems?

Instead, if a student is handed just two or three things to focus on when improving a draft, this seems manageable and realistic. They have time to properly reflect on each issue, experiment with their ideas, seek further advice, revisit the library, and take more thorough action toward those few, specific goals.

After they complete that next draft or assignment, a student will still have other problems in their work. Sure, but if they sincerely worked along your proposed improvements, they have advanced as learners and creators, rather than just got another assignment out of the way.

Efficient Feedback

It is possible for faculty to spend too much of their time grading or providing feedback. If the above is true it becomes counterproductive to pile on with commentary when grading.

By choosing a few action items for each student, you avoid spending time itemizing and commenting on every issue in every student paper, or fall short of that through predictable exhaustion. Plus, if you are asking students to revise a draft or complete a series of similar assignments, you can revisit what directions you gave to each student, when next you assess their work.

Growth as a Course Feature

If the above makes sense to you, then you might consider adopting a multi-stage development assignment, or a series of smaller, similar assignments in your course. Designed to teach as well as assess a set of research, analysis, writing or creative skills, such assignments can help your students systematically learn better scholarship and composition as well as help you understand how students learn, and where they typically suffer setbacks or snags. As students overcome one challenge, you can pose others to them in subsequent assignments, and by the end of the semester they should be demonstrably better at whatever is described in your learning goals and objectives for the course.

Focused, action-item feedback can help students focus on improving their skills and abilities, while saving you time (and aggravation!) as you teach.

Teaching Online: Updates Workshop

You may teach online courses but completed online teaching training years ago. It can be challenging to keep up with developments in online teaching. COLI offers a workshop, Online Teaching and Learning: Updates, where we cover new methods, tools, and other concerns for online teaching faculty.

We also offer a workshop focused specifically on recent additions to D2L.

See and sign up for either of these workshops at our COLI Faculty Development Opportunities page!

Canisius in the News

Francis Lazarus, chair of the presidential search committee for Canisius College, is quoted in a story by Business First about the search for the college’s new president.

To read more click here.

Submitted by: College Communications

School Closings or Delays

Now that we have hit mid-November, we have reached the time when weather may impact our activities on campus. Please take a moment to review the college’s procedures and plans for communication of any impact of weather on normal college activities.

There are several possible options for altering the college’s normal operation due to weather:

  1. Cancellation of all in person classes; staff expected to report
  2. Closing the college; only essential operating personnel should report
  3. Delay of opening; essential operating personnel should report at normal time and other personnel should report once the college is open
  4. Early closing of the college

Decisions about changes to the college’s operations are based on evaluating the effects of current and forecasted conditions on the safety of students, faculty, and staff. There are generally two decision points each day – one in the early morning and a second in the afternoon.

Early Morning Decisions

The decision to close or delay the opening of the college will be made by a group that represents Facilities, Public Safety, Academic Affairs, Student Affairs, and Business and Finance. This group will assess the current conditions, the weather forecast, and the likely effects on college operation and safety. Any decision to alter the normal operations of the college will be communicated to the Canisius community by 6:00 am through a through the following methods/outlets:

  • Canisius Website: canisius.edu
  • Canisius Portal: https://my.canisius.edu/
  • Canisius Alert System
  • School Closing Information Line (888-3131)
  • TV Stations (Channel 2, WGRZ; Channel 4, WIVB; Channel 7, WKBW; Spectrum News 1)

 Afternoon Decisions

Daytime decisions for early dismissal or cancellation of remaining will be made no later than 2:30 p.m. If a decision is made to cancel evening classes (classes beginning after 4:00 p.m.), it will be communicated no later than 2:45 p.m. via the methods/outlets listed above.

Additional Considerations

Cancellation During Final Exam Period

This year, undergraduate final exams are December 13 to 17 (Monday through Friday), and graduate final exams are December 13 to 18 (Monday through Saturday). If classes are cancelled for a day during the final exam period, the closing announcement will include information about the rescheduled exams, which will generally occur on Saturday, December 18 for weekday exams and on Sunday, December 19 for Saturday exams. The college will not cancel exams unless there is a driving ban in Buffalo.

Individual Class Cancellations

Individual course instructors may cancel or choose to hold specific courses remotely when the college is operating normally.  Full-time faculty should communicate such changes directly to students via the D2L email feature and/or the class listproc.  Department chairs may request notification of any unplanned individual class changes.  Adjunct faculty should communicate such changes directly to students via the D2L email feature and/or class listproc as well as inform their department chair.  Faculty should specify their planned cancellation procedure in their syllabus. Students have a duty to regularly check their D2L email feature and any communication from their instructors.

Campus Events and Other Offices

For campus events during evening hours, weekends and holidays, please see the attached Severe Weather Cancellation Procedures for Campus Events from the office of Events Services for directions. Except under special circumstances, The Women’s Business Center and the Center for Professional Development will follow the decision made by the main campus. Admissions (888-2200) and Alumni Relations will control any scheduled weekend events. The library may still be open even if the college is closed. Please check the library’s website for library hours at https://library.canisius.edu/.

Event Cancellations Due to Severe Weather Policy

Academic Preparedness

Faculty are encouraged to consult the Academic Preparedness Guide, which presents ways that professors can use online resources to replace classroom class sessions, rather than lose time and force adjustments to course schedules.

Important Numbers

Main Switchboard: 716-883-7000

Public Safety (Watch Commander): 716-888-2330

NYS Thruway (Radio 1610 AM) 1-800-847-8929

School Closing Information Line: 716-888-3131

Canisius Alert System

If you have not signed up for the Canisius Alert System, please sign up at myCanisius.edu under the Campus Services quick links. You may choose to receive notifications by text, phone call, and/or email.

Related Policies

College Closing and Class Cancellation Policy

Event Cancellations Due to Severe Weather Policy

Staff Remote Work and Telecommuting Policy

Please visit the Academic Affairs Wiki page for further details on this policy.

Submitted by: Amy Beiter, curriculum and student support project associate, Academic Affairs

 

Live Well, Work Well – Decrease your Brain Age

decrease-your-brains-age

The above article from Lawley Insurance Group covers some fun ways to ensure your brain stays young. From learning a new recipe to simply laughing more often, keeping your brain stimulated and active does not have to become yet another chore on your to-do list.

Submitted by: Bethany Voorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

ThankFul November 18th

ThankFul Update:

Chartwells Higher Ed, Canisius USA and Canisius RHA are teaming up to host ThankFul Sit Down Dinner on Thursday November 18 from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. This is a take on the annual faculty served Thanksgiving meal, where faculty come together with our Chartwells team to serve guests dinner.

We are looking for faculty volunteers to sign up for this unique event. To sign up please click on the following link.

We are looking for a lot of volunteers, so please sign up if you are available.

Thank-Ful is a campus-wide friendsgiving event focused on celebrating togetherness, expressing gratitude and giving back to the Buffalo community. This event is going to highlight the fact that we are back on campus and celebrating together as the Canisius community. 

Submitted by: Aaron Abruzzino, marketing manager, Chartwells Higher Ed

 

 

A Mini-Exhibition by the ICMS

The faculty and staff of the Institute for Classical and Medieval Studies will showcase some favorite items from their personal collections in a one-day mini-exhibition. These items hold personal meaning to the donors and we want to share them with the Canisius community.

Visit our display in the library, next to the reception desk, on Tuesday, November 16th, between 10:00 a.m and 2:00 p.m.

Submitted by: Kristina Laun, social media & website administrator, ICMS

Leaves are Falling, Coffee is Calling!

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, as a small expression of gratitude for all that faculty and staff have done throughout another challenging year, please take a moment to relax and enjoy a cup of coffee, tea or hot chocolate on President Hurley from the Tim Hortons on campus!

Vouchers for a medium-sized coffee, tea or hot chocolate will be valid to use on any of the following days: Monday, November 22 – Wednesday, November 24, and will be available for pick-up on any weekday this week or next at the Human Resources Office in Old Main 100 or the President’s Office in Bagen 100.

Submitted by: Bethany Voorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

Separating work from personal use of email

It is always best to separate work from your home life.  How you live on the internet is no different.  On this note, the College strongly recommends that you do not mix your work and personal communications and online accounts.  In accordance with newly adapted Canisius “Acceptable Usage Policy”, we recommend that you do not use your Canisius Email (ending @canisius.edu) for personal communications, or as the Email address connected to various personal accounts, unrelated to your work at Canisius College, on the internet.

Please review your campus email use and take this time to establish an external Email address (such as a free Google Mail or “gmail” account) if you have not already done so.  Use this external Email address for any accounts unrelated to Canisius College, such as social media, personal finance, shopping, and so on.  Share your personal, external Email address with your family and friends and ask them to contact you there for non-work related matters.

Free Email services such as Google’s Gmail often have a mobile app for your phone, so you can maintain your two Email addresses in separate apps, for convenience.  By maintaining a personal email address separate from your professional Canisius College address, you enhance the security, privacy, and organization of both spheres of your online life.

Below is a good article on the subject.

https://lifehacker.com/how-to-separate-your-work-and-personal-life-on-your-dev-1824208389

You can sign up for your free Gmail account here

https://accounts.google.com/signup/v2/webcreateaccount?flowName=GlifWebSignIn&flowEntry=SignUp

The College’s Acceptable Use Policy and other technology related policies can be found here:

https://wiki.canisius.edu/display/HR/Volume+II%3A+2.4+Information+Technology+Policies

As always if you have any questions, concerns or comments please contact the ITS Help Desk at 888-8340, email to helpdesk@canisius.edu or visit http://helpdesk.canisius.edu

Submitted by: Scott Clark, director, User Services/ITS

 

ITS Help Desk services

We just wanted to share a reminder of how to access the ITS Help Desk and some of the services offered. The Help Desk can assist you with any technology questions or concerns related to campus operations including account problems, cell phones, Email, printing, computer issues, VPN, MFA, etc…    If we cannot help we should be able to point you in the direction of who can assist you.

Hours of operation are 8:00 a.m – 5:00 p.m. Monday – Thursday and 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Fridays during the semester.  Between semesters and summers the hours may vary.  They are always announced via The Dome whenever they are changed.

To reach the Help Desk please call 716-888-8340 from off campus or x8340 on campus.  We are available to answer calls during business hours.  After hours and weekends you can leave a voice mail message and we will respond the next business day.  We also encourage you to Email the Help Desk at helpdesk@canisius.edu.  You can do this at any time of the day.  This will automatically generate a trouble ticket in our system and we will be in touch the next business day.  You can also visit us on the web at  http://helpdesk.canisius.edu and enter a trouble ticket at any time.

For basic questions we do have information provided on the web at http://www.canisius.edu/its.  There is also lots of campus information available in the College’s wiki pages at http://wiki.canisius.edu including a section devoted to ITS assistance.

Specific information about printers and copiers can be found in the Wiki located here:

https://wiki.canisius.edu/display/PACC/Departmental+Printing+FAQ

We do not troubleshoot, repair and fix personally owned computer but can advise on options for your home service as time allows.  If you are working remotely, you should be doing so with campus owned hardware. Contact us if you need help with working from home.

As always, if you have any questions, concerns or comments please contact the Help Desk.  We are always happy to assist you.

Submitted by: Scott Clark, director, User Services/ITS

Campus Candid

Students and faculty filled Science Hall on Wednesday, November 10, to partake in a Stress Less Day hosted by the Canisius Counseling Center.  Attendees were able to relax and rejuvenate with activities such as guided yoga, DIY face scrubs, essential oils and rock painting!

Submitted by: College Communications

Canisius in the News

Sara Morris, PhD, vice president for Academic Affairs, was interviewed by Buffalo Business First.  Morris spoke on the importance of adapting to students’ needs in an ever shifting job market and the struggles of training students for careers that may not exist yet. 

Click here to read the story.

Submitted by: College Communications

Episode 4 of the Magis Podcast

Students in Barbara Irwin, PhD and Jamie O’Neil’s communication classes are teaming up this semester to create episodes of “The Magis Podcast,” featuring student-faculty dialogues at Canisius College. 

In this week’s episode, student Hunter Lober-Cummins and Associate Athletic Director for Communications Matt Reitnour discuss the inner workings of NCAA athletics, specifically at Canisius College.

Students involved in the production are Giffin Della Penna (STC & JRN ‘23), Hunter Lobur Cummins (JRN & COM ‘23), Vinnie Christiano III (JRN & COM ‘22), Jon Skuza (JRN ‘22) and Wilson Vershay (COM ‘22).

The podcast is NOW AVAILABLE to listen to on Spotify!

Watch the Trailer:

https://youtu.be/TgBxB5VSfR4

 Listen to the Podcast:

https://open.spotify.com/show/7JA4g7PADZOxqkhTp00wlT

Submitted by: Katie McMahon, graduate assistant, Communication Studies Department

 

Wear Your Gold to Support Canisius Hockey

Please wear your gold and support your Griffs tonight, Friday, November 12, as the Canisius hockey team plays host to RIT at LECOM Harborcenter. Please note – game time is set for 6:00 p.m. Tickets are available for purchase online HERE or at the gate.

The Griffs will close out their weekend set with RIT on Saturday. That game is scheduled to start at 4:00 p.m., at LECOM Harborcenter.

Parking Notice for all fans – with the Buffalo Sabres having home games on Friday and Saturday, parking at the LECOM Harborcenter parking garage will reflect the garage’s special event rate ($20). Fans are encouraged to take the NFTA Metro to the game. Additional parking will be available at other lots within walking distance of the building, subject to their pricing for special events.

Submitted by: Matt Reitnour, associate athletic director for communications, Athletics

 

Employee of Distinction Nominations

Nominate a co-worker for a job well done for the month of November by completing the Employee of Distinction nomination form here.

The Employee of Distinction program provides an excellent opportunity to show appreciation and support for co-workers and to reward them for all they do. The application will request an explanation as to why a candidate is worthy of the award. A list of factors to consider when submitting a nomination include the nominee’s history of accomplishments, level of determination, motivation and interpersonal skills.

The information provided in the application will be used to make a fair and objective selection. Upon supervisor approval, the Employee Engagement Team reviews all nominations and votes each month.

Please have all November submissions completed no later than Monday, November 22.

Submissions after that date will be considered for the month of December. Once a decision is made for November, the Employee of Distinction will be featured in The Dome.  Contact the Human Resources Department at Ext. 2240 or Bethany in the President’s Office at Ext. 2100 with any questions.

Preferred Name/Personal Pronoun/Gender Identification Information

Canisius College recognizes that some faculty and staff use preferred first names other than their legal first name to identify themselves. The college offers the option of the use of a preferred first name to help foster a more welcoming, supportive and respectful campus climate. In addition, you also have the ability to select a personal pronoun and gender identity. To create a preferred name, select your personal pronouns and/or your gender identity, use the link called Personal Information (SSB) found under Campus Services in the portal (my.canisius.edu).

At this time, iAdvise, the online phone directory and my course roster have already been configured to use preferred first names. We have added personal pronouns to all three applications as well.

The college has been updating applications, processes and communications to use preferred names systematically based on requests from administrative offices.  If you need assistance modifying your automated letters, Emails, reports or web applications, please Eemail ITSPROG@canisius.edu, use the subject “Preferred Name Change Request” and send as much information as you can regarding your request; screenshots or attachments are helpful. ITS will review each request and make the change(s). Certain third party integrations, such as tax documents, clearinghouse for transcript requests, FAFSA or other integrations where legal name is required may not be possible to update. This continues to be an ongoing process and your patience is appreciated.

Note: The preferred first name is not a legal name change. Students who are legally changing their names can use the link called Change Address, Name, SSN found under Forms in the portal (my.canisius.edu); faculty and staff should contact the Human Resources Office.

Submitted by: Kevin Smith, AVP and director, Student Records and Financial Services Center

 

Pop into the Library for a Mini Exhibit from ICMS

Stop by the library on Tuesday, November 16 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. to view some of the favorite items collected by the ICMS faculty and staff.

Submitted by: Kristina Laun, social media & website administrator, ICMS

 

Winter 2022 Faculty Development Week Sign-Up Form is Live!

The Academic Affairs office is organizing the 2022 Winter Faculty Development Week, taking place on campus in January, prior to the start of the spring semester. This will be a fantastic set of opportunities in faculty and staff development. We also added more sessions!

Click here for more information on events, panels, workshops, and sessions! Click here to access the sign-up sheet!

The “Week” is longer than a Week! 

  • January 4  – 7- features scholarship support sessions and a writing retreat.
  • January 10 – 13 features sessions focused on pedagogy, including practical methods and resources for improving your courses.

Sessions and Activities include:

  • Supporting Scholarship: A Panel Conversation
  • Session: The Engaged Scholarship Initiative
  • A two-day Writing Retreat hosted by the Canisius College Writing Center
  • Session: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Vital Conversations
  • Session: Building Inclusivity: Awareness and Intention in Classroom and Community
  • Session: Autism Spectrum Disorder Awareness: Characteristics and Recommendations for the College Classroom
  • Panel Discussion: Grading for Equity
  • Session: Ignorance Is No Longer an Excuse: Understanding the Indigenous and American History You Were Never Told… On Purpose
  • Workspace: Crafting an Inclusive Syllabus
  • Session: Title IX/Clery/VAWA: “I Have So Many Questions”
  • Session: Resources for Teaching Information Literacy in the Disciplines
  • Session: Academic Integrity at Canisius: Past, Present, and Future
  • Creating And/Or Editing Griffaudit Plans
  • Session: Using Case Studies in the Classroom
  • Session: Stay Golden, Griffins: Supports for Student Success
  • Jesuit History: A Short Simulation Exercise
  • FYE Session: Debriefing for FYE Faculty

Breakfast and lunch will also be served each day in the Faculty Lounge. Tuesday, January 11 concludes with an appetizer event.

Submitted by: Tyler J. Kron-Piatek, academic technologist, COLI

D2L Dropbox Troubleshooting For Students

The D2L Dropbox is a great way to allow students to submit work at any time of day and allow you, the instructor, to have an easy-to-access repository of their work that you can view, grade, and give feedback on.

However, sometimes students have a difficult time uploading to the Dropbox. Here are a few tips to help them out (feel free to share with your students):

  • A common issue is when students use special characters and spaces in their file names. Make sure that the file name ONLY contains letters and/or numbers. This is a standard recommendation when naming any file intended for upload or internet use. No special characters or symbols like {, }, [, ], #, _, -, etc., or spaces should be used in the file name. Also, avoid long file names. This is because, although D2L may allow files with these characters to upload one day, the next day it may not. Here are some examples:
    • Good file names:
      • kronpiatReading1.docx, tkpHW1.pdf, tylerKPAssignment1.pdf
    • Bad file names:
      • kronpiat reading#1.docx, tkp_HW-1.pdf, tyler K-P_Assignment#[1].pdf
  • Slow or intermittent connection to the internet could interfere with uploading files to the Dropbox Folder. Students should wait for the “File Submission Successful” Screen and should save the email receipt D2L issues with every successful Dropbox Submission.
    • Another useful tip is, if they are on slow internet or having issues in general uploading to the D2L Dropbox, they should switch to a more reliable WiFi internet connection or use an ethernet cable to connect to the interent.

The D2L Dropbox Troubleshooting for Students Wiki Page has all of these tips and more for helping students troubleshoot common issues. If you are interested in sharing this page with your students, here is the link so you can install it in your D2L course:

https://wiki.canisius.edu/display/hd/D2L+Dropbox+Troubleshooting+for+Students

What a Successful Dropbox Submission Email looks like:

Submitted by: Tyler J. Kron-Piatek, academic technologist, COLI

 

 

D2L Fall/Winter Updates

Discussions: Simplified Accessibility & Visibility Management

When: December

Some of the options in D2L Discussion’s Restriction Tab will have updated language and options moved to make it easier to manage restriction, visibility, and access to Discussion boards:

  • Locking Options are being updated so that you only need to set the Start and End date, with Visibility and Accessibility options underneath each
  • The language for Locking Options have been updated to be a bit clearer/simpler:
Availability Start Date Option What it does
Visibile with Access Restricted before start The Discussion topic (or forum) is visible but students will not be able to open it until the start date. Name, date, other restrictions will be visible, but the description will not be.
Visible with submission restricted before start The topic (or forum) will be visible and accessible to students. However, they will not be able to post to it, making it read-only until the start date.
Hidden before start The topic (or forum) is cannot be seen and is not accessible by students until the start date. Notifications will not be sent until the start date.
Availability End Date Option What it does
Visibile with Access Restricted after end The Discussion topic (or forum) is visible but students will not be able to open it after the end date.
Visible with submission restricted after end The topic (or forum) will be visible and accessible to students (they will be able to see posts). However, they will not be able to post to it, making it read-only after the end date.
Hidden after end The topic (or forum) is cannot be seen and is not accessible by students after the end date. Notifications will also stop.

Examples of option selections and how they affect the forum/topic:

The Default is Visible with access restricted before the start (Unlock) and Visible with access restricted after end (Lock):

  • Students cannot see anything beyond the Topic or Forum Title, dates, and other restrictions. For topics specifically, students can see topic stats and who posted last. For forums, students will not be able to see titles of topics.

Visible with submission restricted before start (Unlock) and Visible with submission restricted after end (Lock) (Recommended):

  • Students can see everything above, topic/forum descriptions and details, and also their posts. They will just be unable to post to or participate in topics or forums.

Hidden before start and Hidden after end:

  • The topic (or forum) will only be accessible to students for the dates specified. After that, students will no longer be able to see the topic or forum– it will be made invisible to them.

Visible with access restricted before the start and Visible with submission restricted after end:

  • Students will only be able to see the title of the Forum (and titles of the topics within) or Topic and the associated dates and other restrictions, but not the description. After the end date, they will be able to see everything about the topic (or in the forum) but will not be able to particpate in them or post to them.

For more information, please click this link.

File Upload Warning Messages

When: November

This is mostly for students, but if you ever saw an “Invalid File Type Error”, a new message will now be appearing that provides more information on the issue:

“This file extension is not allowed for security reasons. Please see our Restricted File Extensions article in the D2L Community for more detailed information.”

For Dropbox Assignments, if a student goes to upload a file that you restricted, they will get a message stating “This file extension is not allowed”.

Quizzes: Clearer Wording

When: December

D2L will be updating some of the wording in the Quiz Editor to make it more clear as to what each option does:

Old Wording New Wording
Automatic Grade Automatically Publish Evaluation
Allow attempt to be set as graded immediately after completion Auto-publish attempt results immediately upon completion
Auto-Export to Grades Synchronize to Gradebook
Allow automatic export to grades Sync to Gradebook on publish

Dropboxes: New Editor Made Default

When: December

The new Dropbox Editor, which we reported on in December 2020, will be on by default. This means that you will NOT be able to use the old editor and the new editor will be the only one available to you.

Document Viewer: Toolbar Location Change & Other Changes

When: November & December

There will be two changes happening to the toolbar for the D2L Document Viewer. The first, a minor one, will be moving the tools from the bottom of the page to the top of the page. The iconography will also be updated.

The second change will occur in December. This will streamline these tools further and make them more accessible for users. Certain toolbar tools, like View as Text and Download, will only appear on certain file types, like PowerPoints or Word Docs. PDF’s can only be downloaded by using the download button located near the bottom of the page.

For more information, please view click here or sign-up for the D2L Updates & Changes Workshop here.

If you have any questions about these updates, please contact COLI via the ITS Helpdesk (helpdesk@canisius.edu or helpdesk.canisius.edu)

Staff Vacation Day Deadline Changed

With the enthusiastic support of President John Hurley, the Senior Leadership Team has changed the deadline for taking earned vacation and personal days from May 31 to June 30.

This change will lighten the burden that many departments have experienced when trying to schedule staff vacation time prior to May 31, amidst the high level of activity associated with commencement, the close of the academic year and the close of the fiscal year. Instead, this new deadline will allow staff to take vacation and personal days after many of these major activities are completed and workloads are lighter in most departments.  We have heard that this issue has been a pain point for many of our staff members and hope this change will make your lives easier.

Employees will still be allowed to carry over 37.5 hours of earned vacation time into the following year but personal days must be taken by June 30.

This policy announcement is a follow-up to communication sent out by the Human Resources Department on November 8. Additional information about the policy can be found on the portal under the college’s Policy Manual at https://wiki.canisius.edu/x/t4J4Ag or feel free to contact Human Resources at Ext. 2240.

Submitted by Tim Balkin, Vice President for Business and Finance

Hockey Hosts RIT This Friday and Saturday

The Canisius hockey team returns to home ice at LECOM Harborcenter this Friday and Saturday, November 13-14, as the Golden Griffins play host to Atlantic Hockey rival RIT. Game time on Friday is set for 6 p.m., with Saturday’s contest set for a 4 p.m. start time.

Fans are encouraged to get their tickets in advance by calling the Canisius Ticket Office at (716) 888-TIXX, or by stopping by the Ticket Office in the Koessler Athletic Center lobby anytime between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Fans can also purchase tickets online by CLICKING HERE.

The Griffs are 4-4-1 overall and 1-1-0 in Atlantic Hockey play after defeating Bentley 6-3 on Saturday evening. The home series against RIT starts a stretch where the Blue and Gold will play five of its next six games at home through November 27.

For more information on the hockey program, follow the Griffs on social media – @GriffsHockey on both Twitter and Instagram. For all Athletic Department news and notes, log on to GoGriffs.com.

Submitted by: Matt Reitnour, associate athletic director for communications, Athletics

 

Social Media Initiative


To faculty, department administrators, students and club leaders: In an effort to increase overall social media presence, the College Communications team is inviting all Canisius-related account administrators to tag @canisius_college in Instagram posts and @CanisiusCollege in Twitter posts.

This is a great way to increase engagement on the college’s institutional social media channels, as well as all related department and club accounts. With more than 6,000 followers on Instagram and nearly 10,000 on Twitter, this will also help the smaller accounts receive additional exposure. Plus, alumni, parents and potential students can enjoy seeing what is going on at Canisius!

This is not mandatory but will be mutually beneficial and help our social engagement across the community. Thank you.

Submitted by: College Communications

ThankFul November 18th

Chartwells Higher Ed, Canisius USA and Canisius RHA are teaming up to host ThankFul Sit Down Dinner on Thursday November 18 from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Thank-Ful is a campus-wide friendsgiving event focused on celebrating togetherness, expressing gratitude and giving back to the Buffalo community. This event is going to highlight the fact that we are back on campus and celebrating together as the Canisius community. 

The event will feature a friendsgiving table that consists of classic Thanksgiving meal items, give-back activities and a Thank-Ful wall for people to share their gratitude for others. As a part of this incredible event, we are hosting a canned food drive for the entire month of November with a bin in the faculty lounge or dining hall. We will be serving turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce, gravy and much more. 

Please join us for the fun as we give thanks and feast on some delicious food!

Submitted by: Aaron Abruzzino, marketing manager, Chartwells Higher Ed

 

 

Griffin Coverage Request Form

Dear Professors,

In order to diversify the news section of The Griffin and make sure we are covering newsworthy events, here is an open google form that you can fill out at any point if you want The Griffin to cover your event!

You also can always Email me at Faas1@my.canisius.edu

Submitted by: Natalie Faas, news editor, The Canisius Griffin

Fall 2021 Faculty Development Lunches and Resources

A reminder to join in two casual lunch meetup groups that came out of the Summer Faculty Development week! We also have asynchronous resources to support your faculty development needs during the semester and look forward to seeing you at faculty development sessions during the winter intersession.

Lunch Meetup Groups in the Newly Revamped Faculty Lounge:

Join with your colleagues for conversation and connection over lunch in the faculty lounge. Lunch will be provided from a variety of local restaurants throughout the semester. Please click here to RSVP for some or all of the lunch groups this semester. Note that because lunch is provided, this event is only open to vaccinated individuals.

  • Inclusive teaching. Join in conversation about general strategies from grading to open education resources to supporting individual students. Our last meeting is at 12:00 p.m. on Monday, December 6 (12/6).
  • Scholarship and writing. Come together to support and commiserate about any form of academic writing and think longingly of future writing retreats! Meets at 12:00 p.m. on the following Mondays: November 22, (11/2) and December 13, (12/13).

Thanks to those colleagues who suggested faculty meetup groups for two topics and who have joined us so far!

Asynchronous Resources:

Winter Intersession Development Opportunities:

The first week of January, we will enjoy a scholarship-focused week with a day focused on faculty scholarship resources followed by a multi-day on campus writing retreat to help you kick off the year strong. The second week of January, get ready for Winter Faculty Development Week with a focus on inclusive and innovative teaching strategies. Please click here for more information and to RSVP!

If you have other suggestions for faculty development opportunities, please do not hesitate to reach out to Jenn Lodi-Smith, assistant vice president for academic affairs, at lodismij@canisius.edu.

Submitted by: Jennifer Lodi-Smith, AVPAA and professor, Psychology

 

IRS Announces 2022 Contribution limits for 403(b) plans

The IRS has announced the new maximum contribution limits for 2022 for 403(b) plans. The annual maximum contribution limit for those under age 50 will increase to $20,500. Employees over age 50 may contribute an additional $6,500, increasing the annual maximum contribution limit to $27,000 for 2022.

To make a change to your contribution amount for 2022 go to www.tiaa.org/canisiuscollege .

  • Click on Enroll or Update under the Your Retirement Benefits heading
  • Log into your TIAA Account. If you have never registered for your online account, you can do so from this screen.
  • Click on Manage Contributions
  • Enter the percentage you would like to contribute. This amount does not include the college’s contributions.
  • Select Future Date and enter the date you would like your new contribution to begin.
  • Click on Next
  • Acknowledge the Terms & Conditions and then click Confirm

 

For faculty and staff, a change must be entered before midnight of December 19 to be effective the first pay in 2022.  For Public Safety and SEIU employees, the change must be entered before midnight on Monday January 10 for the first pay in 2022.

TIAA will notify Human Resources of the change request. Human Resources will update the contribution amount.

If you have any questions, please contact Human Resources at Extension 2240.

Submitted by: Dawn Rotterman, Benefit Manager, Human Resources

 

Join Your Asynchronous Discussions

Many faculty use asynchronous or message-board discussions in their courses. These are usually in the D2L discussions space and toolset, but Hypothes.is discussions may qualify as asynchronous discussions, too.

Either way, you can achieve a much greater presence and influence in your students’ perception of the course by participating in these discussions. Often, instructors build discussions around great prompts, set deadlines for student participation, and then do not add anything to the discussions. Professors may worry that if they did, they would be intruding on a space for students. Or, they might get in the way of a student making a similar comment or insight. Other instructors may just feel that it is too much effort, on top of other instructor responsibilities.

But there are several relatively low-effort ways you can contribute to discussions, so that they are richer and more instructive for students. Your contribution might transform an asynchronous discussion from a writing assignment to an actual conversation.

Here are some suggested instructor posts or replies to asynchronous discussions:

Model Post

Early on in a semester write a discussion post that represents a high-quality contribution to an asynchronous discussion. Message board participation requirements can vary widely from course to course, so your model post helps students know what your particular requirements are for this activity.

Steer a Thread Back on Track

If a discussion generates enthusiasm, students may veer off topic. You may tolerate that, if it satisfies learning objectives. For example, as a historian, I want students to analyze sources. If three students turn to critically discussing a source they read for another class, I may permit it despite their having drifted from the source I assigned that week.

On the other hand, off-topic conversation can be time-consuming and counterproductive. A well-placed follow up question by the professor might get students back to the topic at hand. For example: “The use of shipping containers by militaries is interesting but returning to the article, what are the business implications of container-freight for the Suez, Panama, Kiel and Corinth canals?”

Encourage a Student to Say More

Occasionally students simply do not say enough, or are vague. You may not be sure of the point they are making. Or, you may or may not sense that they didn’t do the weekly reading. Either way, you can give a student a second opportunity to respond in greater depth or detail, and your prompt for this indirectly illustrates your requirements to the other students as well.

For example: “I think your comment refers to Dom’s insistence on discipline, but what do you think he means by discipline, specifically as it relates to his Jewish partisan comrades?”

Highlight an Excellent Contribution

Occasionally a student writes the perfect post that meets the assignment requirements exactly. Point it out! This helps this student know they are on track, and others to see what you want them to do. You might also link it to something else in the course, or in the wider discipline, just to emphasize the importance of good work.

Example: “This is a great observation concerning bankruptcies, because you’ve highlighted exactly why infrastructure receiverships can be so expensive and time-consuming. Years ago I researched Pittsburgh Railways Company’s bankruptcy in the mid-Twentieth Century. It took twelve years! While accounting is much quicker now, the legal back-and-forth can still last years.”

Correct a Falsehood

You might read where a student is, to be plain, wrong about something. They are in the process of learning and appropriately you can reply with a correction, for their and their classmates’ benefit. Obviously, consider how to do this with tact and constructive grace.

A student may make an incorrect generalization beyond the course content, but if they missed something available in course content, direct them to revisit it.

For Example: “The term ‘nun’ is not directly synonymous with ‘sister’ in the Catholic faith tradition. But the two terms are commonly, if not accurately, used interchangeably in everyday conversation and even a lot of Catholics are not aware of the distinction. Take a look at the article by Van Eindhoven, that we read back in Week 3; how are nuns set apart from other orders of Catholic sisters?”

Reply Selectively

Do not attempt to reply to teach students in each asynchronous discussion. You probably cannot (or should not) spare that kind of time. Moreover, you may find that you are stepping in front of students who might ask constructive questions of each other. You might choose one or two posts a week, for which one of the above reply options works best. This is more than enough to establish a supportive instructor presence in the class, without becoming a distraction.

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Submitted by: Tyler J. Kron-Piatek, academic technologist, COLI

Regular and Substantive Interaction Online

In a recent revision to the Higher Education Opportunity Act, the U.S. Department of Education has elaborated a requirement for instructed online courses offered by colleges and universities participating in Title IV funding. This includes regular and substantive interaction (already an acronym! RSI). This means courses where the professor proactively engages with students during the course, and students must regularly participate in course activity and meet course deadlines. Canisius College online courses must exhibit RSI, in order for Canisius students to be eligible for federal financial aid.

It is helpful to understand RSI by describing an alternative: correspondence courses that are self-paced and in which an instructor – or “subject matter expert,” “facilitator,” or really caretaker takes a passive role. Correspondence courses are not eligible for federal financial aid. Subject matter experts may develop such courses and star in recorded lectures. Possibly, someone grades student work, or grading may be automated. In correspondence courses, someone may answer occasional student questions if and as they come in.

At Canisius College, our online classes are not correspondence courses, but instead are properly instructed or taught by active faculty. RSI requirements are great practices for any online teaching, and are familiar to anyone teaching online courses at Canisius.

You can read more about RSI requirements, and suggestions to meet them, at this link.

No list is complete, as there are many fantastic ways to interact with your students using technology available on the internet. That said, here are some quick basics, with tips on how to promptly align your course with RSI:

All courses require Regular interaction.  This includes

  1. Good course design: repetitive and well-documented organization of content and activities.
  2. Frequent (ex. weekly) instructor-initiated communications, starting with a course orientation and including weekly orientations.
  3. Frequent assignments, with individual feedback to students.
  4. Use of the D2L gradebook to monitor and help students monitor their own progress.
  5. Course pace enforced with start dates on content and regular deadlines for assignments.
  6. Regular office hours (via Zoom or D2L chat) posted on your syllabus.
  7. If a student has not logged in or participated in the course in over a week, email them.

All courses require at least two forms of Substantive Interaction.  This means

  • Direct instruction: Synchronous teaching via Zoom, live chat, or similar realtime remote technology.
  • Assessing or providing feedback on student’s work.  See the third and fourth points above; frequent, helpful and actionable feedback to students beyond just numerical grade scores.  An instructor should monitor student engagement through assessments and participation in course activities.
  • Providing information or responding to questions regarding the content of a course or competency.  Scheduled office hours (via Zoom), Course FAQs, prompt replies to student emails, course and weekly orientations, and excellent course documentation all contribute to this.
  • Facilitating a group discussion regarding the content of a course or competency.  Assign regular asynchronous discussions, and participate in them yourself.

Substantive interaction may involve many other options than just those above.  What the DoE seeks is proactive participation by the instructor during the course, rather than just course-building, caretaking, and answering student questions.  In synchronous courses, discussion meetings via Zoom can help satisfy RSI although exclusively lecturing via Zoom is insufficient.

We discuss these at greater length in our Online Faculty Development Course, Online Updates workshops, weekly emails and newsletters, and other faculty development. More importantly, we offer a greater variety of tools and options so you are not just limited to the above. As always, you can email us with specific questions about online teaching methods and technology.

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Submitted by: Tyler J. Kron-Piatek, academic technologist, COLI

 

Announcing the Employee of Distinction for October!

The Human Resources Department is pleased to announce that Andrew Smith is the Canisius College Employee of Distinction for October 2021. Andy was nominated for this award by Bill Maher, who wrote the following:

“Andy Smith, Assistant Athletic Director for Sports Medicine is in his 25th year leading our Athletic Training staff that is responsible for ensuring the care and medical safety of over 500 of our varsity and club student-athletes at the College. Throughout the fall (and all of last year…) Andy has served as our department’s point person as we navigate the Covid-19 pandemic helping us work through the required protocols that are necessary to ensure our training and competition opportunities.

Andy has worked to put in place a testing program for our student-athletes, personally overseeing our 3X/Covid-19 testing and to date has conducted over 3700 Covid-19 tests for our student-athletes. Without his efforts to secure the ability to conduct these tests and his leadership in organizing and conducting the testing, our program would not have been able to meet the testing requirements necessary for our student-athletes to continue to participate.

In addition to this “new” responsibility, Andy has continued to provide the leadership and guidance to our athletic training staff to ensure they are prepared to serve each of our teams and provide for their health and safety. Often called on to cover additional practices and games while juggling staffing assignments through recent turnover, Andy always works to ensure that our teams are taken care of and have the necessary athletic trainer coverage to allow them to practice safely.

While this nomination is for his recent efforts in both testing and staffing support/coordination, his efforts over the last 18 months have been exemplary and are clearly in the category of “above and beyond”. We would not have been able to continue our program operations without Andy’s efforts.

Andy is a very deserving “employee of the month” and I very much appreciate his professionalism and dedication to our students.”

Please join the Human Resources Department in congratulating Andy on this achievement!

Submitted by: Bethany Voorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

The Library Would Like to Know

As part of ConnectNY, the Library is starting an initiative to raise the awareness of Open Educational Resources (OER) among the faculty. Open Educational Resources are textbook and other course materials that are produced by faculty across the country and posted as Open Source using Creative Commons licenses. These texts are often peer reviewed and vetted by the platforms on which they appear.

The Library would like to know who has adopted OER’s and the level of awareness among faculty. To that end, we ask faculty to fill out a very brief survey to help us move forward.

Click HERE to access the survey.

Submitted by: Patricia Coward, Ph.D., assessment and instruction coordinator, Library

Teaching Online: Updates Workshop

You may teach online courses but completed online teaching training years ago. It can be challenging to keep up with developments in online teaching. COLI offers a workshop, Online Teaching and Learning: Updates, where we cover new methods, tools, and other concerns for online teaching faculty.

We also offer a workshop focused specifically on recent additions to D2L.

See and sign up for either of these workshops at our COLI Faculty Development Opportunities page!

Submitted by: Tyler J. Kron-Piatek, academic technologist, COLI

Campus Candid

 More than 200 students from 15 local high schools were on campus Thursday, to participate in the 43rd annual Model UN Conference. The event was a great experience for students to practice debating and sharing ideas in a professional setting. The high school students were all over campus, from the Montante Cultural Center to the Regis rooms, all dressed in business professional clothes and eagerly waiting their turns to speak.

A special thank you is owed to all the staff for organizing the event and all the Canisius students who were helping the high schoolers!

Submitted by: College Communications.

Canisius in the News

Canisius is excited to share the news that Kevin Hardwick, PhD, associate professor of political science and Erie County legislator, was elected Erie County Comptroller on Tuesday, November 2. And the campus community isn’t the only one talking about it. Click on the links below to view the various news outlets that reported on Hardwick’s win.  

To read more at The Buffalo News click here.

To read more at WKBW-TV (Channel 7) click here.

To read more at WIVB-TV (Channel 4) click here.

To read more at  WGRZ-TV (Channel 2) click here.

Submitted by: College Communications

Canisius Recognizes First-Generation Students with Series of Special Events

Canisius College is celebrating its first-generation of students with a series of special events and activities leading up to and following National First-Generation College Student Day on November 8.  The celebrations are being organized by the ALANA Student Center at Canisius, with support from the Griff Center for Student Success, Student Life and Event Services.  They are aimed at recognizing students who come from families where their biological parents did not complete a four-year college degree.

To learn more about the series, which continues through November 15, click here .

Submitted by: College Communications

Volunteers Needed for Food Giveaway

Please consider volunteering on Saturday, November 20 to distribute turkeys and produce boxes to our neighbors.  The event begins at 10 a.m. at the Spillman Lot, corner of Jefferson Ave. and Florida St. (behind the KAC).   A drive-through process will be in place and volunteers will help load the cars that come through the line.  Please contact Mary Rockwell, rockwell3@canisius.edu, if you are interested in participating.

Submitted by: Mary Rockwell, PhD, director, The New Buffalo Institute

 

 

Medieval Music in the Montante Cultural Center

ArtsCanisius and the Institute of Classical and Medieval Studies present the professional debut of the musical trio Pavana. Join us for an evening of Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque music in the Montante Cultural Center on Tuesday, November 9, at 7:00 p.m.

All in-person attendees must wear a mask and practice social distancing. Donations are being requested at the door to continue to bring events like this to the community.

Submitted by: Kristina Laun, social media & website administrator, ICMS

ArtsCanisius Welcomes Four Groups to Montante Cultural Center

Please join us as we host Pavana, Buffalo Girlchoir, A Musical Feast, and the Buffalo Silver Band on campus this semester. Below are listings for these concerts, and please also note that our three Students Ensembles will perform in Montante Cultural Center too.

Pavana – Renaissance and Baroque music performed by a singer/musicologist, Suzanne Fatta and two lutenists, Daniel Yost and Roland Hayes. Tuesday, November 9, 2021 at 7:00 p.m. (See the above Dome post for more information about this specific event.)

Buffalo Girlchoir –  “Rise up Singing” performance. Sunday, November 14, 2021 at  3:00 p.m.

A Musical Feast – a dynamic evening of music and poetry. Saturday, November 20, 2021 at 7:00 p.m.

Buffalo Silver Band – a wonderful group performing sensational works. Saturday, December 11, 2021 3:00 PM

Submitted by: Yvonne K. Widenor, M.A., visiting assistant professor and art history program director, Fine Arts Department

Winter 2022 Faculty Development Week Sign-Up Form is Live!

The Academic Affairs office is organizing the 2022 Winter Faculty Development Week, taking place on campus in January, prior to the start of the spring semester. This will be a fantastic set of opportunities in faculty and staff development. We also added more sessions!

Click here for more information on events, panels, workshops, and sessions! Click here to access the sign-up sheet!

The “Week” is longer than a Week! 

  • January 4  – 7- features scholarship support sessions and a writing retreat.
  • January 10 – 13 features sessions focused on pedagogy, including practical methods and resources for improving your courses.

Sessions and Activities include:

  • Supporting Scholarship: A Panel Conversation
  • Session: The Engaged Scholarship Initiative
  • A two-day Writing Retreat hosted by the Canisius College Writing Center
  • Session: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Vital Conversations
  • Session: Building Inclusivity: Awareness and Intention in Classroom and Community
  • Session: Autism Spectrum Disorder Awareness: Characteristics and Recommendations for the College Classroom
  • Panel Discussion: Grading for Equity
  • Session: Ignorance Is No Longer an Excuse: Understanding the Indigenous and American History You Were Never Told… On Purpose
  • Workspace: Crafting an Inclusive Syllabus
  • Session: Title IX/Clery/VAWA: “I Have So Many Questions”
  • Session: Resources for Teaching Information Literacy in the Disciplines
  • Session: Academic Integrity at Canisius: Past, Present, and Future
  • Creating And/Or Editing Griffaudit Plans
  • Session: Using Case Studies in the Classroom
  • Session: Stay Golden, Griffins: Supports for Student Success
  • Jesuit History: A Short Simulation Exercise
  • FYE Session: Debriefing for FYE Faculty

Breakfast and lunch will also be served each day in the Faculty Lounge. Tuesday, January 11 concludes with an appetizer event.

Submitted by: Tyler J. Kron-Piatek, academic technologist, COLI

Better Feedback on Student Work

A chronic complaint among college faculty is that students do not read or act upon the feedback professors provide on student work. But properly conceived feedback to individual students can be as much or more important than anything you present in lecture or have students do in other activities. Here are some tips to make feedback more efficient and effective.

When grading exams, homework, papers or essays, reports, and other student work, professors work hard to provide comprehensive feedback. “Grading” is often spending time describing to students, via red pen or keyboard, how they can do better either on a specific subsequent assignment, or in the future generally. After all that time and effort assessing student work it is disheartening to discover that a student subsequently made halfhearted improvements, or ignored the feedback altogether.

Feedback as Next Steps

Instead of attempting to comment on every issue you find in a student’s work, consider this: If you could only pick a few, what are the next actions on which the student should focus their reflection, time, effort, and courage?

How many next actions or steps depends on assignment design, length, scale, scope, frequency, and so on. But generally, for a short writing assignment you may need to supply only one direction for a next step. For a longer or larger assignment, you might pick several. Likely, these are issues

  • that are fundamentals in your course subject, disciplinary content or style of communication.
  • that are more urgent. For example, if a student has not mastered a particular concept, they may not be able to advance in the course.
  • for which you can quickly highlight numerous instances. That is, a more common problem in their work.

However you choose next actions for each student, you are directing them to focus on a few important issues rather than itemizing every flaw in their assignment submission.

Actionable Feedback

It is possible for faculty provide too much feedback. When students see a carpet of red ink down the margins of their paper, or an essay almost as long as that which they submitted detailing all large and small problems with their work, they can easily become discouraged. They might reason: Is all this worth it, or can I just live with a C? A C grade might not derail their future career plans, but their resignation stops their learning or developing as writers, researchers or creators.

Plus, even if they are willing to consider their professor’s feedback, where do they begin? Where should they spend more time: improving their argument? Improving visual aids? Revisiting their organization? All those sentence construction problems?

Instead, if a student is handed just two or three things to focus on when improving a draft, this seems manageable and realistic. They have time to properly reflect on each issue, experiment with their ideas, seek further advice, revisit the library, and take more thorough action toward those few, specific goals.

After they complete that next draft or assignment, a student will still have other problems in their work. Sure, but if they sincerely worked along your proposed improvements, they have advanced as learners and creators, rather than just got another assignment out of the way.

Efficient Feedback

It is possible for faculty to spend too much of their time grading or providing feedback. If the above is true it becomes counterproductive to pile on with commentary when grading.

By choosing a few action items for each student, you avoid spending time itemizing and commenting on every issue in every student paper, or fall short of that through predictable exhaustion. Plus, if you are asking students to revise a draft or complete a series of similar assignments, you can revisit what directions you gave to each student, when next you assess their work.

Growth as a Course Feature

If the above makes sense to you, then you might consider adopting a multi-stage development assignment, or a series of smaller, similar assignments in your course. Designed to teach as well as assess a set of research, analysis, writing or creative skills, such assignments can help your students systematically learn better scholarship and composition as well as help you understand how students learn, and where they typically suffer setbacks or snags. As students overcome one challenge, you can pose others to them in subsequent assignments, and by the end of the semester they should be demonstrably better at whatever is described in your learning goals and objectives for the course.

Focused, action-item feedback can help students focus on improving their skills and abilities, while saving you time (and aggravation!) as you teach.

Why We Need a Social Media Examen

Facebook has had a tough couple of months.

If you’ve been following the news, you know that a series of investigative reporting, a flurry of testimony and interviews both on the Hill and on our TV screens and a consortium of international journalists – all spurred by the work of a Facebook analyst-turned-whistle blower – have revealed what we probably all already knew: Some pretty bad stuff happens on – and apparently at – Facebook.

Instagram tanks the self-esteem of young people. Facebook’s algorithm makes us all angrier. And communities from Ethiopia to Myanmar suffer unspeakable violence and hate because no one seems able or willing to adequately monitor all the content produced across the globe.

And to cap off these disturbing series of reports, we learn that Facebook is doubling down on the digital world it’s creating, evidenced by the company’s new name, Meta.

If science fiction has taught us anything, we should know to be at least a little skeptical of the creation of parallel or alternate universes, particularly those powered by machines and fully virtual in their manifestation. I’m pretty sure that was the moral of The Matrix.

This isn’t just about Facebook, though; this is about social media, the ecosystem we all sink and swim in every single day. Problematic though it is – and it is in many ways – social media is here to stay.

In the First Week of The Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius challenges us to look closely, honestly, thoroughly at our sins and our sinfulness. It’s his hope that we feel tremendous sorrow for the many times we’ve refused or ignored God’s love, yes, but it’s also his desire that we see the full scope of suffering in our world. With God, we see the vast brokenness of creation; we’re moved to tears.

We desire to stand with Jesus, to see all things new through the eyes of Christ, and give ourselves to God’s project of love, mercy and compassion, to realize God’s dream. We desire to heal the brokenness in ourselves and the wounds our brokenness has caused in our world.

This only works, though, if – to borrow once again the words from Walter Burghardt, SJ – we take “a long, loving look at the real.” We cannot shy away from the world’s great need, the tremendous suffering of humanity and creation.

Isn’t this exactly what we are so often tempted to do in our mindless scrolling through one social feed after another? Isn’t this the endgame of Facebook’s supposed metaverse? We separate ourselves from the world. More significantly, we become increasingly accustomed to living disjointed lives.

After all, are the images we share on Instagram long, loving looks at our actual lives, or lives we pretend to have? What feelings, then, are we trying to stir in our viewers? Jealousy? Envy? Anger?

Does TikTok put in front of us content that is reflective of the many needs of our world, or the trends most likely to keep us on the platform? Do we engage to promote the common good, or to feel relevant and timely?

Do our tweets engage with the brokenness of others, or do we just poke and poke and poke at wounds until they fester and bleed? Our echo chambers, after all, often only show us what we want to see — or what we enjoy gossiping about.

If these Facebook reports only confirm what many of us already suspected, then what responsibility do we have – have we had – to act?

Social media is here to stay, but we can’t look at it as just another series of apps or even just one more source of news. It’s become a mediating force through which we experience reality – or don’t.

And Ignatian spirituality is deeply concerned with how we experience reality because that’s where God is; that’s where God’s people are, where God’s creation continues to unfold. Finding ourselves lost in screens disconnects us from ourselves, our bodies, our presence in the created world.

We must continue to challenge ourselves and one another to look honestly, deeply, painfully at what is really happening in our world around us each and every day, not just what is fed to us through algorithms.

And so, I invite you to take time praying with this social media examen.

    1. God is here. All things come from God; God is present in all things – even the darkest of corners of social media. Give thanks to God for the people on the other side of each Twitter handle and TikTok video, for each person navigating these feeds, for the ability to connect with people near and far in such innovative ways. All of these people are made in God’s image
    2. Ask for light. Ask God for the grace to see and reflect truth, beauty and humanity in all you do across social media.
    3. Pay attention to details. Each image, each tweet, each prayerful request or unkind remark reveals something of God’s people and God’s creation. What needs, deep wounds or hurts do you see? Do you find yourself judging others? Who are the people being marginalized, cast aside or maligned? What needs do they have? On the other hand, what beauty do you see here? Where are people uplifting others, calling attention to important affairs or sharing joy? What feelings does this stir in you? Are they good or bad?
    4. Do I reflect God’s love? How are you called to respond in productive ways to what you witness? Are you able to in this particular medium? Do you feel pressured to nonetheless? In your own words and images, do you share something good and true, or do you tear others down or point only to yourself? Are you obsessed over clicks, likes and retweets? Do you share only to boost your own ego or brand? How are you contributing to a culture that refuses to take a “long, loving look at the real?” What feelings are you trying to stir in others?
    5. Disconnect. God is much greater than your screen. Take time to encounter God, God’s people and God’s creation; do not let yourself become absorbed in the digital world. Ask God for clarity in discerning how to cultivate Ignatian indifference toward social media – in other words, to use social media only to the extent that it helps you praise, reverence and serve God and God’s people and creation, and disconnect yourself from it when it does not.

In the end, as Ignatius’ First Principle and Foundation suggests, we must be equally content with likes, retweets, shares and comments, as we are with posts that go unnoticed in so far as both help us achieve all that God intends. But we must proceed lightly, mindful that we do not turn social media – or our own social presence – into a god.

This reflection is part of a weekly series that you can get sent right to your inbox by signing up at Jesuits.org/weekly.

Eric A. Clayton is the deputy director for communications at the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States. He is the author of the forthcoming book “Cannonball Moments: Telling Your Story, Deepening Your Faith” (Loyola Press). His writing has appeared in America Magazine, National Catholic Reporter, Give Us This Day and more.

 

HR Awards 2nd Pizza Party

Of all the difficult decisions that get made every day at Canisius, perhaps none was more frightening than deciding on a winner of the 2021 Halloween Costume Contest. As reported in Monday’s edition of The Dome, the Department of Physician Assistant Studies won the coveted pizza party for its collective costume featuring “101 Dalmatians.”

But we just couldn’t get the efforts of the Student Records and Financial Services Office out of our mind. The team ‘dressed up’ as a Buffalo Bills tailgate party complete with red, white and blue Zubaz and jerseys that paid homage to Bills’ quarterbacks, past and present. Under their easy-up tent was an ongoing game of corn hole and a buffet of Buffalo’s best fare. (Fortunately, the group refrained from the slamming of any folding tables… )

With so many putting in such a scary-good effort, the Human Resources Department is doing what is only fair …. It’s awarding a second pizza party to the Student Records and Financial Services Office.

Certainly, this year’s competition was well-matched and it proved that there are a whole lot of creative minds on campus. Now we can’t wait to see what happens next year …

Submitted by: College Communications

Fall 2021 Faculty Development Lunches and Resources

A reminder to join in two casual lunch meetup groups that came out of the Summer Faculty Development week! We also have asynchronous resources to support your faculty development needs during the semester and look forward to seeing you at faculty development sessions during the winter intersession.

Lunch Meetup Groups in the Newly Revamped Faculty Lounge:

Join with your colleagues for conversation and connection over lunch in the faculty lounge. Lunch will be provided from a variety of local restaurants throughout the semester. Please click here to RSVP for some or all of the lunch groups this semester. Note that because lunch is provided, this event is only open to vaccinated individuals.

  • Inclusive teaching. Join in conversation about general strategies from grading to open education resources to supporting individual students. Meets at 12:00 p.m. on the following Mondays: November 6, (11/8) and December 6 (12/6).
  • Scholarship and writing. Come together to support and commiserate about any form of academic writing and think longingly of future writing retreats! Meets at 12:00 p.m. on the following Mondays: November 22, (11/2) and December 13, (12/13).

Thanks to those colleagues who suggested faculty meetup groups for two topics!

Asynchronous Resources:

Winter Intercession Development Opportunities:

Pencil in the dates! The first week of January, we will enjoy a scholarship-focused week with a day focused on faculty scholarship resources followed by a multi-day on campus writing retreat to help you kick off the year strong. The second week of January, get ready for Winter Faculty Development Week with a focus on inclusive and innovative teaching strategies. Stay tuned to your email, The Dome, and weekly COLI updates for more information!

If you have other suggestions for faculty development opportunities, please do not hesitate to reach out to Jenn Lodi-Smith, assistant vice president for academic affairs, at lodismij@canisius.edu.

Submitted by: Jennifer Lodi-Smith, AVPAA and professor, Psychology

 

International Relations to Host 43rd Model UN Conference

On Thursday, November 4, the International Relations Program will welcome 200 students from 15 area high schools to campus for the 43rd Annual High School Model United Nations Conference. Student delegates will represent countries from around the world to discuss, debate and attempt to formulate resolutions on pressing issues of the day, including but not limited to the conflict in Ethiopia, women’s rights in Latin America, access to Covid vaccines across the world, and the internet as a human right.

The conference features four concurrent simulated sessions of international deliberative bodies including the United Nations Security Council, the Economic and Social Council, and the Human Rights Council, as well as a historic simulation of the UN Security Council. A volunteer staff of members of Canisius College will moderate and adjudicate the proceedings, which challenge participants to learn rules of parliamentary procedure as well as information about specific countries’ positions on controversial international issues. Our volunteer staff is largely drawn from our student club, the Model UN Diplomacy Organization (MUNDO).

 Please take special care when driving near Montante Cultural Center and the Student Center between the hours of 7:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. as there may be student delegates and school buses present in these areas. I thank you in advance for showing that warm Canisius College hospitality to our guests.

The International Relations Program also thanks the Canisius College staff (including events management, public safety, dining services, admissions, and especially Rachel Lapinski of the Political Science Department and the work-study students there) and our hardworking college volunteers for making this stimulating and educational experience possible for our guests.

Submitted by: Paola Fajardo-Heyward, PhD, associate professor and chair, Chair Political Science

 

Is it a cold, the flu or COVID-19?

flu-shot-wellness-tip_10-26-21

With Covid-19 continuing to be a concern, it can be very confusing and stressful if you start to develop any respiratory symptoms. This short read from Independent Health Association provides some clarity on figuring out whether you might have a cold, the flu, or Covid-19. In addition to listing some wellness tips for each, the article also notes the importance of getting vaccinated. To find out what is best for you, please make sure to consult your physician first.

Submitted by: Bethany Voorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

 

TIAA November Live Webinars

november-2021-fe-webinar-flyerada-002

Get your finances in check with the help of the above webinars offered by TIAA for the month of November.

Take a look at the list for days, times and how to register to attend. Click here to get started!

Submitted by: Bethany Voorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

 

Episode 3 of the Magis Podcast

Students in Barbara Irwin, PhD, and Jamie O’Neil’s communication classes are teaming up this semester to create episodes of “The Magis Podcast,” featuring student-faculty dialogues at Canisius College. 

In this week’s episode, Valeria Abejón Fuertes, an international student from Spain, speaks  with Spanish Professor Margaret Stefanski, PhD,from the Department of Modern Languages, about what it’s like to study and live in a  foreign country. This episode was produced by Julia Barth (JRN ‘23), Joey Williams (IMC ‘22), Hannah Nelson (JRN ‘22), Thomas McBride (DMA ‘22), and Carrie Kremer (JRN ‘22).  

The podcast is NOW AVAILABLE to listen to on Spotify!

Watch the Trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ei_LVOzL4o

Listen to the Podcast:

https://open.spotify.com/episode/6Ez7umZq4kGjH7WSmmnMrv?si=f9190bc2980a45d6

Submitted by: Katie McMahon, graduate assistant, Communication Studies Department

 

 

 

Winter 2022 Faculty Development Week

Stay tuned to the Dome and COLI Blog for more information & sign-ups!

The Academic Affairs office is organizing the 2022 Winter Faculty Development Week, taking place on campus in January, prior to the start of the spring semester . This will be a fantastic set of opportunities in faculty and staff development.

The “Week” is longer than a Week! 

  • January 4  – 7- features scholarship support sessions and a writing retreat.
  • January 10 – 13 features sessions focused on pedagogy, including practical methods and resources for improving your courses.

Sessions and Activities include:

  • Supporting Scholarship: A Panel Conversation
  • Session: The Engaged Scholarship Initiative
  • A two-day Writing Retreat hosted by the Canisius College Writing Center
  • Session: Building Inclusivity: Awareness and Intention in Classroom and Community
  • Session: Autism Spectrum Disorder Awareness: Characteristics and Recommendations for the College Classroom
  • Panel Discussion: Grading for Equity
  • Session: Ignorance Is No Longer an Excuse: Understanding the Indigenous and American History You Were Never Told… On Purpose
  • Workspace: Crafting an Inclusive Syllabus
  • Session: Title IX/Clery/VAWA: “I Have So Many Questions”
  • Session: Resources for Teaching Information Literacy in the Disciplines
  • Session: Academic Integrity at Canisius: Past, Present, and Future
  • Session: Using Case Studies in the Classroom
  • Session: Stay Golden, Griffins: Supports for Student Success
  • FYE Session: Debriefing for FYE Faculty

Breakfast and lunch will also be served each day in the Faculty Lounge. Tuesday, January 11 concludes with an appetizer event.

Submitted by: Tyler Kron-Piatek, Academic Technologist, COLI

D2L Fall/Winter Updates

Discussions: Simplified Accessibility & Visibility Management

When: December

Some of the options in D2L Discussion’s Restriction Tab will have updated language and options moved to make it easier to manage restriction, visibility, and access to Discussion boards:

  • Locking Options are being updated so that you only need to set the Start and End date, with Visibility and Accessibility options underneath each
  • The language for Locking Options have been updated to be a bit clearer/simpler:
Availability Start Date Option What it does
Visibile with Access Restricted before start The Discussion topic (or forum) is visible but students will not be able to open it until the start date. Name, date, other restrictions will be visible, but the description will not be.
Visible with submission restricted before start The topic (or forum) will be visible and accessible to students. However, they will not be able to post to it, making it read-only until the start date.
Hidden before start The topic (or forum) is cannot be seen and is not accessible by students until the start date. Notifications will not be sent until the start date.
Availability End Date Option What it does
Visibile with Access Restricted after end The Discussion topic (or forum) is visible but students will not be able to open it after the end date.
Visible with submission restricted after end The topic (or forum) will be visible and accessible to students (they will be able to see posts). However, they will not be able to post to it, making it read-only after the end date.
Hidden after end The topic (or forum) is cannot be seen and is not accessible by students after the end date. Notifications will also stop.

Examples of option selections and how they affect the forum/topic:

The Default is Visible with access restricted before the start (Unlock) and Visible with access restricted after end (Lock):

  • Students cannot see anything beyond the Topic or Forum Title, dates, and other restrictions. For topics specifically, students can see topic stats and who posted last. For forums, students will not be able to see titles of topics.

Visible with submission restricted before start (Unlock) and Visible with submission restricted after end (Lock) (Recommended):

  • Students can see everything above, topic/forum descriptions and details, and also their posts. They will just be unable to post to or participate in topics or forums.

Hidden before start and Hidden after end:

  • The topic (or forum) will only be accessible to students for the dates specified. After that, students will no longer be able to see the topic or forum– it will be made invisible to them.

Visible with access restricted before the start and Visible with submission restricted after end:

  • Students will only be able to see the title of the Forum (and titles of the topics within) or Topic and the associated dates and other restrictions, but not the description. After the end date, they will be able to see everything about the topic (or in the forum) but will not be able to particpate in them or post to them.

For more information, please click this link.

File Upload Warning Messages

When: November

This is mostly for students, but if you ever saw an “Invalid File Type Error”, a new message will now be appearing that provides more information on the issue:

“This file extension is not allowed for security reasons. Please see our Restricted File Extensions article in the D2L Community for more detailed information.”

For Dropbox Assignments, if a student goes to upload a file that you restricted, they will get a message stating “This file extension is not allowed”.

Quizzes: Clearer Wording

When: December

D2L will be updating some of the wording in the Quiz Editor to make it more clear as to what each option does:

Old Wording New Wording
Automatic Grade Automatically Publish Evaluation
Allow attempt to be set as graded immediately after completion Auto-publish attempt results immediately upon completion
Auto-Export to Grades Synchronize to Gradebook
Allow automatic export to grades Sync to Gradebook on publish

Dropboxes: New Editor Made Default

When: December

The new Dropbox Editor, which we reported on in December 2020, will be on by default. This means that you will NOT be able to use the old editor and the new editor will be the only one available to you.

If you have any questions about these updates, please contact COLI via the ITS Helpdesk (helpdesk@canisius.edu or helpdesk.canisius.edu)

ITS Upgrades Scheduled

ITS will be applying server, database and Banner upgrades to our production environment, on Saturday November 6, 2021 from 6:00 am – 9:00 am. During this maintenance window, the Banner Application, Self-Service Banner (Student Profile, timesheets, leave balances, etc), custom web apps (iAdvise, budget management, timeclock, new student checklist, etc) and Griffaudits will be unavailable.

The ITS systems status page, found in dark blue top section of the portal, will be updated accordingly.

If you encounter any issues post upgrade, please contact the help desk at helpdesk@canisius.edu or at 888-8340.

Submitted by: Michele Folsom, director, Administrative Computing, ITS

Campus Candids

Pictured (above): Cruella de Vil and her “101 Dalmatians”

(l-r) Jennifer Trillizio, clinical assistant professor; Donna Anderson, clinical assistant professor; Nicole Scovazzo, clinical assistant professor; Aimee Larson, chair and program director of PA Studies; Stehpanie Snios, clinical assistant professor; Christina Scovazzo, clinical skills coordinator;
and Kimberly Bernosky-Smith, associate professor

Thank you to everyone who participated in last Friday’s Halloween Costume contest! The communications team received so many ‘spooktacular’ submissions (see pictures below) but we could only select one winner for the pizza party.

And the winner is …. (drum roll) … the Department of Physician Assistant Studies, which channeled Disney’s “101 Dalmatians” (above). Congratulations to the entire team! A member of the Human Resources Department will be contacting you to arrange for your pizza party.

Take a look below for more costumes donned by your Canisius colleagues for Halloween. And be sure to scroll all the way through to the end, for pictures of the Student Records & Financial Services team which ‘dressed up’ as a Buffalo Bills tailgate party, complete with an easy-up tent, corn hole and a buffet of Buffalo’s favorite foods.

Pictured (right) Matt Piatkowski, associate director of student life

Pictured (above): The graduate assistant team from the ALANA Student Center


Members of the Women’s Business Center (pictured, l-r): Rahim Melon, graduate assistant; Christel Brown, coordinator; Heather Jason, assistant director; Sara Vescio, executive director; and Samantha Long, Covid recovery coordinator

Submitted by: College Communications

Canisius in the News


Julie Anna Golebiewski, PhD, associate professor of economics and finance, spoke with The Buffalo News about the lower unemployment rate this year, while having fewer workers in the region. 

To read more click here.

Submitted by: College Communications

Halloween Costume Contest

No tricks – only treats for the department that wins today’s campus-wide Halloween costume contest.  In order to be considered in this friendly competition, submit photos of your department dress-up to Audrey Browka at browkaa@canisius.ed, by the end of the day, today.  The department that’s selected as having the most creative costume wins a pizza party. 

Submitted by: Bethany Voorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

 

Announcing the Employee of Distinction for September

The Human Resources Department is pleased to announce that Erin Zack is the Canisius College Employee of Distinction for September 2021. Erin was nominated for this award by Sandy Miller and Courtney Sullivan.

Erin currently works as the director of alumni engagement and was selected for this award because of her enthusiasm for her job and for the college, which is very evident to all who come in contact with her. Erin is hard-working, creative, flexible, open-minded, and a great team player. All of these qualities were especially helpful during the difficult transition to the virtual world. Erin worked hard to keep alumni engaged during the pandemic by sending out regular communications, deploying new virtual methods to connect alumni with one another, and organizing several professional development opportunities and virtual reunions for alumni. 

Overall, Erin has made an invaluable impact on the college and among alumni through her positive attitude, willingness to help, strong work ethic, friendly demeanor, and overall commitment to the mission of the college.

Please join the Human Resources Department in congratulating Erin on this achievement!

To nominate a co worker for the upcoming months, click here.

Submitted by: Bethany Voorhees, executive associate, President’s Office

 

First Episode of the Student-Created Magis Podcast

Students in Barbara Irwin, PhD and Jamie O’Neil’s communication classes are teaming up this semester to create episodes of the Magis Podcast, featuring student-faculty dialogues at Canisius College. 

 In this week’s episode, titled, Motivating Athletes and Overcoming Adversity, Erika Joseph (COM/PSY ‘22) and Professor of Kinesiology Karl Kozlowski, PhD, take an in-depth look at overcoming adversity and the struggles that come with injuries, and dissect the influence of intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation on an athlete.  

This episode of the student-created podcast was produced by Conor Zillisch ‘24 (COM & ECO),  Erika Joseph ‘22 (COM & PSY), Lilly McDonnell ‘23 (COM), Vincent Barile ‘22 (DMA), and Ryan Clark ‘22 (DMA).  This episode is NOW AVAILABLE on YouTube and Spotify! Click the link below to listen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qy3GCWqSA04

https://anchor.fm/jamie-oneil/episodes/Magis-Podcast-ep2-Motivating-Athletes-and-Overcoming-Adversity-e19c2h9

Submitted by: Katie McMahon, graduate assistant, Communication Studies Department

 

 

Qualtrics: New Results/Reports Screen Coming

In December, survey and data-gathering tool Qualtrics will receive a new, improved screen for generating results visualizations and reports. For a few months, users will be able to choose the old Reports dashboard. or a new Results dashboard and toolset, before the old Reports screen is phased out.

  • In early December the new Results screen will appear as an option to project owners and editors.
  • In February, the new Results screen will be the default, with the old Reports screen still available until June.
  • In June, 2022, old reports will become read-only for three months before disappearing.
  • Users should anticipate downloading any reports in existing surveys in Summer 2022.

You can get details about the new results dashboard here.

D2L Fall/Winter Updates

Discussions: Simplified Accessibility & Visibility Management

When: December

Some of the options in D2L Discussion’s Restriction Tab will have updated language and options moved to make it easier to manage restriction, visibility, and access to Discussion boards:

  • Locking Options are being updated so that you only need to set the Start and End date, with Visibility and Accessibility options underneath each
  • The language for Locking Options have been updated to be a bit clearer/simpler:
Availability Start Date Option What it does
Visibile with Access Restricted before start The Discussion topic (or forum) is visible but students will not be able to open it until the start date. Name, date, other restrictions will be visible, but the description will not be.
Visible with submission restricted before start The topic (or forum) will be visible and accessible to students. However, they will not be able to post to it, making it read-only until the start date.
Hidden before start The topic (or forum) is cannot be seen and is not accessible by students until the start date. Notifications will not be sent until the start date.
Availability End Date Option What it does
Visibile with Access Restricted after end The Discussion topic (or forum) is visible but students will not be able to open it after the end date.
Visible with submission restricted after end The topic (or forum) will be visible and accessible to students (they will be able to see posts). However, they will not be able to post to it, making it read-only after the end date.
Hidden after end The topic (or forum) is cannot be seen and is not accessible by students after the end date. Notifications will also stop.

Examples of option selections and how they affect the forum/topic:

The Default is Visible with access restricted before the start (Unlock) and Visible with access restricted after end (Lock):

  • Students cannot see anything beyond the Topic or Forum Title, dates, and other restrictions. For topics specifically, students can see topic stats and who posted last. For forums, students will not be able to see titles of topics.

Visible with submission restricted before start (Unlock) and Visible with submission restricted after end (Lock) (Recommended):

  • Students can see everything above, topic/forum descriptions and details, and also their posts. They will just be unable to post to or participate in topics or forums.

Hidden before start and Hidden after end:

  • The topic (or forum) will only be accessible to students for the dates specified. After that, students will no longer be able to see the topic or forum– it will be made invisible to them.

Visible with access restricted before the start and Visible with submission restricted after end:

  • Students will only be able to see the title of the Forum (and titles of the topics within) or Topic and the associated dates and other restrictions, but not the description. After the end date, they will be able to see everything about the topic (or in the forum) but will not be able to particpate in them or post to them.

For more information, please click this link.

File Upload Warning Messages

When: November

This is mostly for students, but if you ever saw an “Invalid File Type Error”, a new message will now be appearing that provides more information on the issue:

“This file extension is not allowed for security reasons. Please see our Restricted File Extensions article in the D2L Community for more detailed information.”

For Dropbox Assignments, if a student goes to upload a file that you restricted, they will get a message stating “This file extension is not allowed”.

Quizzes: Clearer Wording

When: December

D2L will be updating some of the wording in the Quiz Editor to make it more clear as to what each option does:

Old Wording New Wording
Automatic Grade Automatically Publish Evaluation
Allow attempt to be set as graded immediately after completion Auto-publish attempt results immediately upon completion
Auto-Export to Grades Synchronize to Gradebook
Allow automatic export to grades Sync to Gradebook on publish

Dropboxes: New Editor Made Default

When: December

The new Dropbox Editor, which we reported on in December 2020, will be on by default. This means that you will NOT be able to use the old editor and the new editor will be the only one available to you.

If you have any questions about these updates, please contact COLI via the ITS Helpdesk (helpdesk@canisius.edu or helpdesk.canisius.edu)

Campus Candids

Canisius College celebrated the 2020 and 2021 service milestones of faculty, staff and administrators on Monday during a recognition breakfast in the Grupp Fireside Lounge. The room was full with employees commemorating 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 years of service to the college. Rev. Jack Mattimore, SJ, opened the celebration with a morning prayer. President John J. Hurley then spoke briefly, offering his thanks and gratitude to the honorees for their dedication to Canisius and its students.

Below is the full list of 2020 and 2021 Service Recognition Honorees:

2020 and 2021 Service Recognition List of Honorees

40 Years in 2020

Eileen C. Herbert – Chief Communications Officer/Director of Communications

Veronica A. Serwacki – Executive Associate to Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences

40 Years in 2021

Dr. Guy H. Gessner – Associate Professor of Marketing & Information Systems

Dr. Nancy J. Rosenbloom – Professor of History

Michael E. Szymendera – Director of Infrastructure/Network Engineering

35 Years in 2020

Dr. Mick Cochrane – Chair & Professor of English

Michael G. Dolan – Professor of Kinesiology

Rev. Daniel Jamros, SJ – Professor of Religious Studies

Margaret M. Kraatz – Financial Aid Specialist and Special Projects

Dr. Ian J. Redpath – Chair & Professor of Accounting

35 Years in 2021

Patricia H. Creahan – Director of Student Health Center

Mary A. Koehneke – Associate Director of Student Records & Financial Services

Christopher J. Mejak – Lead Electrician for Facilities Management

Dr. Charles J. Pelitera – Professor of Practice of Kinesiology & Director of Health & Wellness

Brian P. Smith – Director of International Students & Study Abroad

Alan D. Weitzsacker – System Administrator III for ITS

30 Years in 2020

Dr. Edward J. Garrity – Professor of Marketing & Information Systems

Dr. Julie S. Gibert – Associate Professor of History & Associate Dean for School of Arts & Sciences

Lt. John F. Hach – Public Safety Lieutenant

Dr. Mariusz M. Kozik – Professor of Chemistry/Biochemistry

Dr. R. Mark Meyer – Associate Professor of Computer Science

Dr. H. David Sheets – Professor of Physics and Director of Data Analytics

30 Years in 2021

Dr. Richard Falkenstein – Professor Emeritus of Fine Arts

Dr. Barbara J. Irwin – Professor of Communication Studies

Michele A. Rizzo – Assistant Director of Financial Services

25 Years in 2020

Kevin M. Smith – Assistant VP & Director of Student Records & Financial Services

Yvonne K. Widenor – Teaching Faculty of Fine Arts

25 Years in 2021

Scott D. Clark – Director of User Services for ITS

Vanessa M. Clay – Public Safety Dispatcher

Dr. John S. Dahlberg – Chair & Professor of Communication Studies

Walter J. DuBois – Stationary Engineer I for Facilities Management

Dr. Robert J. Grebenok – Professor of Biology

Dr. Sara R. Morris – VP for Academic Affairs

Elaine M. Mrugala – Administrative Associate for Student Life

Dr. Craig D. Rogers – Associate Professor of Economics & Finance

Marc J. Schnirel – System Administrator III for ITS

Andrew N. Smith – Assistant Athletic Director for Sports Medicine

Dr. Melissa B. Wanzer – Professor of Communication Studies

20 Years in 2020

Dr. Michael J. Forest – Professor of Philosophy

David J. Koenig – Computer Support Specialist III for ITS

Dr. Ronald H. Kotlik – Director of Education Technology & Emerging Media Program

Dr. Shawn O’Rourke – Co-Chair & Associate Professor of Sports Administration/Grad Administrative Program Advisor

James A. Phillips – Public Safety Security Guard

Dr. Michael E. Rutter – Associate Professor of Counseling & Human Services

Kevin D. Stone – Stationary Engineer I for Facilities Management

20 Years in 2021

Dr. Barbara A. Burns – Chair & Professor of Teacher Education

Dr. Debra T. Burhans – Associate Professor of Computer Science

Frank Clark IV – Housekeeper for Facilities Management

Benjamin J. Dunkle – Professor of Digital Media Arts

Dr. Kristin E. Finn – Professor of Teacher Education

Angela Galante – Financial Aid Specialist

Dr. Marya Grande – Professor of Teacher Education

Ronald J. Haberer – Controller

Dr. Mark Hodin – Professor of English

Dr. Christopher R. Lee – Associate Professor of Religious Studies & Theology

Erik T. Michaelsen – Instructional Media Technician for the Media Center

Dr. Howard Stanger – Professor of Management and Affiliate Faculty of History

Lisa M. Sullivan – Librarian/Collection & Instructional Services

Dr. Steven H. Szczepankiewicz – Associate Professor of Chemistry/Biochemistry

Dr. Nancy V. Wallace – Interim Dean for School of Education & Human Services

Dr. Amy L. Wolf – Associate Professor of English

Laura A. Zirnheld – Student Records Specialist

15 Years in 2020

Dr. Patricia A. Coward – Assessment Coordinator for the Library

Pamela M. Dart – Programmer Analyst for ITS

Dr. Jennifer A. Desiderio – Associate Professor of English

Rosemary A. Evans – Administrative Associate for School of Education & Human Services

Dr. Timothy M. Gregg – Associate Professor of Chemistry/Biochemistry

Dr. Rosanne L. Hartman – Professor of Communication Studies

Dr. Dennis W. Koch – Associate Professor of Professional Studies/HHP Programs Director

Dr. Jonathan D. Lawrence – Associate Professor of Religious Studies & Theology

Dr. Christopher J. Lopata – Professor of Psychology & Co-Director for Institute for Autism Research

Dr. Tanya M. Loughead – Professor of Philosophy

Brian S. McIntyre – Public Safety Officer

Donna L. Ortolani – Student Affairs Administrative Specialist for Public Safety

Mark J. Piatkowski – Associate Director of Student Life

Deborah W. Prohn – Registrar & Assistant Director of Student Records & Financial Services

Dr. Ronald M. Rivas – Professor of Management

Erica C. Sammarco – Associate Vice President

Kimberly J. Walkow – Executive Associate to the Dean of Wehle School of Business

Richard V. Warcholak – Stationary Engineer I for Facilities Management

15 Years in 2021

Elizabeth P. Caffee – Director of Academic Talent Search

Kathleen M. DeLaney – Reference Librarian & Archivist

Dr. Lorreine DiCamillo – Associate Dean for School of Education & Human Services

Jennifer J. Herrmann – Associate Dean for Student Success for the Griff Center

Dr. Byung-Jay Kahng – Professor of Mathematics & Statistics

Kristine E. Kasbohm – Director of the Library

Sandra M. McKenna – Academic Program Coordinator for Physician Assistant Program

Nancy I. Mercado – Housekeeper for Facilities Management

Dr. Timothy J. Servoss – Associate Professor of Psychology

Dr. Phillip M. Sheridan – Chair & Professor of Chemistry/Biochemistry

10 Years in 2020

Sierra M. Bonerb – Associate Director of Support Services for the Griff Center

Russell P. Calianno – Programmer Analyst I for ITS

Allen W. Callwood – Public Safety Officer

Carlton Coker, Jr. – Housekeeper for Facilities Management

Dr. Katie S. Costanzo – Associate Professor of Biology

Philip J. Davis, Sr. – Counselor for Academic Talent Search

Dr. Paola C. Fajardo-Heyward – Interim Chair & Associate Professor of Political Science

Dr. Charles A. Goodsell – Chair & Associate Professor of Psychology

Matthew K. Kochan – Librarian and Head of Public Services for the Library

Kristina L. Laun – Administrate Associate for ITS

Dr. Lisa M. Morey – Co-Chair & Associate Professor of Biology

10 Years in 2021

Dr. Denise M. Akin – Clinical Instructor of Psychology

Dr. Allyson D. Backstrom – Director of George E. Schreiner, M.D. ’43 Pre-Medical Center

Angela M. Butler – Advancement Coordinator for Institutional Advancement

Dr. Stephen A. Chanderbhan – Associate Professor of Philosophy

Dr. Mark K. Gallimore – Director of Center for Online Learning & Innovation

Margaret E. Garfoot – Director of Applied Nutrition Program & Office of Professional Studies

Dr. Jean A. Gregorek – Associate Professor of English

Kimberly A. Griffin – Head Coach of Women’s Softball

Katherine M. Huck – Director of Advancement Services

Dr. Karl F. Kozlowski – Professor of Kinesiology

Jennifer M. Lavoie – Assistant Director of Admissions Processing

Dr. Jennifer Lodi-Smith – Associate VP of Academic Affairs & Associate Professor of Psychology

Joshua M. Martin – Admissions Processing Associate

Dermot P. McGrane – Head Coach of Men’s Soccer

Janet M. McNally – Associate Professor of English & Creative Writing

Jeffrey M. Proehl – Librarian/Head of Technology Services for the Library

Dr. Richard D. Reitsma – Chair & Associate Professor of Modern Languages

Lisa A. Rowley – Staff Nurse for the Student Health Center

David A. Shakarjian – Senior Programmer Analyst/DBA for ITS

Eileen Tally – Student Accounts Supervisor for Student Records & Financial Services

5 Years in 2020

Luis R. Ayala – Housekeeper for Facilities Management

Amy K. Beiter – Curriculum & Student Support Project Associate for Academic Affairs

Dr. Julie Anna M. Golebiewski – Associate Professor of Economics & Finance

Dr. Daniel P. Haeusser – Associate Professor of Biology

Patricia A. Herkey – Creative Director of Marketing & Communication

Joshua E. Kruk – Digital Marketing Director for Marketing & Communication

Kelly L. Schultz – Associate Controller

Timothy J. Seil – Assistant Director of Athletic Facilities

Carolyn M. Thompson – Coordinator & Supervisor for Office of Field Experience

Linda M. Walleshauser – Associate VP for Human Resources & Compliance

5 Years in 2021

Jarrett L. Abelson – Director of Athletic Communications

Dr. Nathan L. Arbuckle – Associate Professor of Psychology

Suli M. Calianno – Canisius Fund Coordinator

Jeannette N. Delaney – Senior Assistant Director of Undergraduate Admissions

Laura J. Ginter – Housekeeper for Facilities Management

Chris E. Hawkins – Assistant Coach for Men’s Basketball

Laurie A. Hennessy – Administrative Operations Coordinator for Athletics

Cavina T. James – Associate Director of HEOP for C.O.P.E.

Matthew R. Kwiatkowski – Assistant Director of Undergraduate Admissions

Garrett L. Layton – Director of Digital Media and Athletic Communication

Sandra A. Miller – Senior Director of Corporate, Foundation & Government Relations

Erik J. Schneider – Working Foreman & Housekeeper for Facilities Management

Courtney T. Sullivan – Leadership Giving Officer for the Canisius Fund

Dr. Sarah L. Tulin – Assistant Professor of Biology

Reggie Witherspoon – Head Coach of Men’s Basketball

Lauren L. Young – Director of Institutional Research & Effectiveness

Submitted by: College Communications

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