Select Page

BANANA TIME
A PUBLICATION OF ACADEMIC COMPUTING ADVISORY COMMITTEE,
BANANA TIME IS PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY, FALL & SPRING.
SEND SUBMISSIONS FOR BANANA TIME TO WIGLEY@CANISIUS.EDU.

NAME: Pocket
DESCRIPTION: Application to create a tagged reading list of web-based articles
PURPOSE: Work or Play
OS: All platforms, browser-based
PRICE: free
SOURCE: http://getpocket.com/
BANANA RATING: 5 Bananas out of 5 Bananas
RATED BY: Estelle Siener, Academic Computing, Information Technology Services

Overwhelmed with links to web sites and PDFs that you receive in email from colleagues?

Although email is a quick way to keep in touch, for many of us email is more valuable as an access to professional distribution lists and academic research trends.  But those valuable nuggets are mixed in with the mundane day-to-day notices, not to mention junk mail, in our Inboxes!  It’s difficult to make time during the day to read the important links or papers, let alone organize them.  They end up sitting in your Inbox waiting until you have time, or reason to remember a particular item.

A little web-based application called Pocket may be the answer you are looking for.  Pocket, formerly called Read It Later, can be installed as an “add-on” in your browser.  Set up a username and password, and add the Pocket app to your favorite browser on the various computers and mobile devices you use.   As you click a link in email, or as you are browsing the web, click the Pocket icon to “save” the link in a list.  Your reading list will be synchronized across all the devices you use.  Later when you are ready to read, you can view your list and read the articles.  Articles can be tagged for easy searches, or deleted after they are read.  Pocket has the additional benefit of keeping your Inbox streamlined, because once a link is saved, the message can be deleted from your Inbox or filed in a folder.

If you want to save an article more “permanently” use applications like Delicious, Diigo, Evernote, or Zotero for more organizational capabilities, including notetaking.  But those are topics for another Banana Time!
-ES

BANANA TIME is the namesake of an article by the late Donald F. Roy.  Roy said (p. 166) that his “…observations seem to support the generally accepted notion that one key source of job satisfaction lies in the informal interaction shared by members of a work group.”  Roy, D. F. (1959).  “Banana Time” Job satisfaction and informal interaction, Human Organization, 18, 158-168. A free downloadable pdf of the article appears at
http://64.6.252.14/class/377a/Readings/roy-bananatime.pdf